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Standards Australia/Electrotechnology and Energy

Standards Australia is the country’s leading independent, non-governmental, not-for-profit standards organisation. We are also Australia’s representatives of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

We are specialists in the development and adoption of internationally-aligned standards in Australia.

Although we develop standards, we are not responsible for enforcing, regulating or certifying compliance with those standards.

The electrotechnology and energy sector comprises of the physical generation and energy transmission infrastructure, the components and devices, and the installations and appliances on the electricity network. Also included in the sector is gas transportation, gas distribution, gas appliances and alternative energy sources.

Safety is the main driver of standards development for the sector, however, other standards activities focus on clean energy, reliability of supply, and performance. Standards play a vital role in streamlining processes and improving efficiency, assisting with the overall profitability and export competitiveness for Australian companies.

Standards Australia is actively engaged with the sector and is committed to developing contemporary Australian and International standards that deliver a high level of safety, performance and environmental protection to the sector.

Across the energy supply chain, there is a shift toward smarter and interconnected products and services. As infrastructure becomes increasingly reliant on technology, there is a greater need to heighten security measures and standards, in order to protect critical energy infrastructure.

Locations: Asia/Pacific - Australia
 
2020-06-17
Location: Newsletter
Description:

Standards Australia has today welcomed the announcement by Minister for Trade, the Hon. Simon Birmingham, on the commencement of formal negotiations between Australia and the United Kingdom on a future Free Trade Agreement (FTA).

“The prospect of a Free Trade Agreement with the UK has been highly anticipated by many Australian industry sectors, and today we can see the road ahead,” said CEO of Standards Australia, Adrian O’Connell.
 
“Greater trade and integration of our two economies would potentially realise tremendous value for both countries, rebuilding a new dimension to our unique historical relationship. A collective push towards greater economic opportunity for industry in both nations will be strongly embraced,” added Mr O’Connell.
 
FTAs are underpinned and supported by harmonised standards that enable industries to compete in both markets. Typically this involves Australia and the UK adopting the same international standard, giving products and services a common set of technical specifications.
 
“Standards Australia has contributed to several FTAs previously, and we look forward to supporting this opportunity Australia has to be one of the first countries to enter into an FTA with the UK,” said Mr O’Connell.    

Media Contact: Scott McGrath
02 9237 6044 | 0429 809 337
scott.mcgrath@standards.org.au

Contact Name: Scott McGrath
Phone: +612 9237 6044
Address: 20 Bridge Street
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
URL: https://www.standards.org.au
Comments: GPO Box 476 Sydney NSW 2001 tel:+61 2 9237 6000
2020-06-05
Location: Australia
Description:

Standards Australia welcomes the nation’s new Comprehensive Strategic Partnership with India

The growing relationship Australia has with India has been bolstered overnight following the agreement between the two nations on a Comprehensive Strategic Partnership.
 
“An agreement of this nature underpins so much potential in a relationship between nations such as Australia and India, and congratulations is due to both Prime Minister Morrison and Prime Minister Modi,” said CEO of Standards Australia, Adrian O’Connell. “While there were some priority areas of engagement identified by the leaders of both nations, the commitment shown to making this type of agreement has no limit on its potential benefits.”
 
Areas covered by this partnership agreement cover research, cyber security, infrastructure, trade, education, logistics, defence science, and Indo-Pacific maritime issues.
 
“Standards Australia has been involved in the similar Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement recently signed with Indonesia, (IA-CEPA) and has contributed to opening up trade between the two nations,” said Mr O’Connell. “In our early work on the IA-CEPA, we worked with our Indonesian counterparts to identify harmonised standards between our two economies as a means of enabling avenues of trade.”
 
“We are excited by the prospect of repeating the success found between Australia and Indonesia with a country of growing trade opportunities like India. Australia has a proud history as a trading nation, and with partnerships like this being delivered by the Prime Minister we have a strong future also,” concluded Mr O’Connell.   

Media Contact: Scott McGrath
02 9237 6044 | 0429 809 337

scott.mcgrath@standards.org.au

2020-05-25
Location: Newsletter
Description:

CEO report

With this week being National Volunteer Week, I took some time to reflect on the significant contribution that volunteers make to Australian life.
 
The Australian Bureau of Statistics reported a few years ago that approximately 6 million Australians are volunteers. This is an incredible number of individuals giving their time, resources and expertise to a vast range of causes.
 
At Standards Australia, we are very fortunate to work with over 5,000 committee members who contribute their time and expertise to develop and adopt standards that help inform consumers, support industry and protect individuals across the country. Without this contribution to the development of high quality and trusted solutions the world would be very different.
 
The way that our community has adapted to the remote working arrangements that are now in place has been remarkable and reflects the agility and commitment of all participants and what is possible in terms of innovation. To all of you who work with us, including our 2019/2020 NEXTgen class who graduated this month, thank you. 
 
I also commend to you our In conversation piece below with Beer Opatsuwan. Beer started his standards work with us as a young leader and exemplifies everything we want this program to deliver.


—Adrian O'Connell, Chief Executive

Cool change will see Australian homes pump up the heat

Winter has well and truly settled in for 2020, and with temperatures dropping the heaters are coming out of the garage, sweaters are being dusted off and the energy bill is likely going up as we choose to spend even more time in the comfort of our homes.
 
Australian Standards set out requirements for the safe design, use and energy consumption of heaters and similar electrical appliances heavily used in winter.
 
Read more in our media release.

Committing Australia as an ally in the Pacific

Standards Australia has called for Australia to deepen its engagement and work closer with our nearest neighbours. The call was made in a recent submission to a parliamentary inquiry into strengthening Australia’s relationships with Pacific countries.

Countries across the globe are grappling with the challenges of COVID-19, but some countries in the Pacific are dealing with these while recovering from the destruction of Cyclone Harold which hit the region in April 2020.

Read more in our media release.

What do you think? SMB Survey

After our IEC Standardization Management Board Consultation (Zoom) event in early May on Australia's involvement in the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission), we want to know the thoughts of any and all stakeholders on the opportunities for Standards Australia at an international level.

If you’d like to share your feedback or thoughts on the priorities and pain points of Australia’s international standards involvement, please complete our survey.

Communicating our progress

In an effort to keep you up to date on our Technical Governance Review (TGR) journey, we have recently produced some blog-style updates on initiatives related to our TGR.

The importance of digital transformation, written by our General Manager Operations Kareen Riley-Takos, outlines and discusses the technological innovations Standards Australia has introduced.

Dispute Resolution Evolution, by Project Manager Kate Orr recounts her experience with Standards Australia’s new dispute resolution governance document.

Applications: NEXTgen and IEC YP program

The IEC Young Professional program is now open for applications and the Standards Australia 2020/2021 NEXTgen program will be accepting applications from 29 May. These programs are a fantastic opportunity to be mentored by an expert and learn all about the world of standards, with the potential of one day sitting on a committee and contributing to integral standards development.

If you’re interested, you can apply for NEXTgen and the IEC Young Professional program on the Standards Australia website.

Learn more with Academy workshops

Standards Australia is committed to supporting our committee members through the provision of training and we are pleased to say the following courses will be held on a fortnightly basis:

  • Facilitating standards development – designed for Committee Chairs or aspiring Chairs
  • How to write an Australia Standard – designed for committee members this course covers the principles of writing clear, performance-based Standards

 For a full range of dates please login to your Academy account select the course and date you wish to attend and then register. Please contact academy@standards.org.au if you have any questions.

In conversation with Beer Opatsuwan

Beer Opatsuwan is a chartered electrical engineer and a chartered manager currently working for Energy Queensland, which operates Australia’s largest electricity distribution network. Beer graduated from Curtin University with a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering, holds a Post-graduate Certificate from Queensland University of Technology and pursuing an MBA. Beer’s portfolio of experience covers a broad range of engineering management projects within the energy industry in Australia and the UK. In 2015, Beer was recognised as Queensland young professional engineer of the year. As the Manager Intelligent Grid Program, Beer is responsible for the development and maintenance of intelligent grid solutions project governance and coordination for Energy Queensland.

In addition to his contribution to standards development at a national and international level, Beer is also currently supporting Standards Australia’s General Mananger Operations Kareen Riley-Takos as alternate on the IEC Standardization Management Board.
 
Standards Australia (SA): Why do you think standards are important?
Beer Opatsuwan (BO): There are three reasons that come to mind:

  • Standards are a powerful channel to influence our society for the better. Amongst many positive forces is the potential for standards to level the playing field for stakeholders across various sectors thus fostering competitive markets.
  • They’re a robust facilitating platform to foster Australia's economies leveraging the diversity of thought.
  • An enabler to market monopoly disintegration and a catalyst for new technology acceleration.

SA: You’re the IEC Standardization Management Board (SMB) alternate for Kareen Riley-Takos, what has that experience been like so far and what is to come?

BO: It has been a steep learning curve as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is a complex organisation. I have been able to gain insights into the IEC's management framework, its strengths, weaknesses and have been rapidly formulating ideas into how to make a positive impact.

The 1st SMB meeting in New Delhi was a huge eye-opener for me. I was able to interact with many experienced SMB members from across the globe, each providing me with their perspectives to help solve pressing matters to the IEC.

My vision for the IEC is to advocate for agile operations as a critical pillar for IEC/SA to keep up with a rapidly changing world. As a former Young Professional, I strive to be the glue between the IEC Young Professionals Programme (emerging leaders) and established leaders to attract/retain the world’s best leaders/experts in the field to support the work of standardisation.

With Kareen's depth of standardisation experience and support, I want to work with her to inspire trust and foster strong linkages and relationships between IEC, Standards Australia, the Australian electrotechnical sector and other National Committee members.

SA: How can we get more young people involved and educated about standards?

BO: The conversations regarding standardisation need to start at the grass-root level. I see an opportunity for standardisation bodies to work with universities and generate an awareness of national and international standardisation.

Young professionals should be aware that they can make an impact on the Standardisation forum. The old-age mentality of standardisation is reserved for experienced professionals nearing retirement needs to be eliminated.
I see an opportunity for Standards Australia to work closely with Engineers Australia and other industry technical forums (e.g. CIGRE and IEEE etc.) to promote the work of standardisation to young and experienced engineers.

SA: What do you think is the future of standardisation?

BO: The standards platform becoming more agile in its operations whilst maintaining consensus rigour. Standards will be borderless, inclusive, exciting, balanced, digital-centric and readily accessible.

Increased use of Artificial Intelligence and machine learning to coordinate and harmonise intellects from the industry. The standards development systems are becoming more autonomous with a huge amount of operational insights feeding in. This in turn creates more powerful and balanced standards – just look at what Google and Facebook are doing.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from May (PDF)

  • WTO report looks at role of e-commerce during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Proposal for a New Field of Technical Activity on Social Responsibility

Standards help some at risk groups during COVID 19

Sector update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

SDO News

‘Essential’ AS/NZS 4708 standards project zooms ahead

‘Business as usual’ as the AS/NZS 4708 Standards Reference Committee work towards Trans-Tasman Sustainable Forest Management Standard.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, video conferencing has emerged as an important platform for businesses and communities to connect.

Indeed, Australian and New Zealand representatives are ‘zooming in’ to continue essential standard development work. Meeting on a weekly basis, and with representatives from 26 nominating stakeholder bodies, the new format presents significant opportunities and challenges as the committee works towards a public comment release of the first joint Trans-Tasman Sustainable Forest Management Standard in the second half of 2020.

Reflecting on the work to date, Responsible Wood CEO Simon Dorries, is buoyed by the committee’s willingness to adapt to changing conditions and support each other. 

“With so many different stakeholders ‘dialled into’ the conference, from far and wide, the risk of multiple conversations talking over each other is a potential challenge.

“And yet, the committee is practicing remarkable constraint and patience, discussion is robust, as members work towards meeting our ambitious deadlines,” Mr Dorries said.

The new standard will be developed as a fully recognised joint Australia and New Zealand standard, will be audited for acceptance by PEFC International and will meet the rigorous system requirements of a fully-fledged JAS-ANZ accredited Sustainable Forest Management system.

“As an endorsed Australian and New Zealand Standard, it can be used for PEFC and/or Responsible Wood claims and to meet timber legality requirements for import and export,” Mr Dorries said.

For more information about Sustainable Forest Management or the standard development process please contact Responsible Wood.

 

 

2020-05-12
Location: Australia
Description:
  • While COVID-19 restrictions are lifting, the arrival of winter means individuals are still keen to stay indoors and keep warm with the help of their heaters.
  • Australian Standards set out requirements for the safe design, use and energy consumption of heaters and similar electrical appliances heavily used in winter.
  • By making use of energy efficient products and decreasing temperatures by one degree, households can save on their electricity bill that tends to rise in the colder months.

Winter has well and truly settled in for 2020, and with temperatures dropping the heaters are coming out of the garage, sweaters are being dusted off and the energy bill is likely going up as we choose to spend even more time in the comfort of our homes.
 
“COVID-19 for majority of Australians meant remaining indoors, and now that the winter months are here that will likely not change as people choose to stay indoors and enjoy the warmth and comfort of their home. It’s important Australian households making use of heaters to stay cosy can feel confident in the safety of their appliances,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey. 
 
“The cooler months see a 10% increase in the number of house fires, with many of these caused by heaters and electric blankets [1], standards aim to build confidence and assist in the safety and integrity of heating systems.”
 
Alongside safety considerations, with an increase in use of heating and heating appliances consumers also often see a rise in their household energy bill. The minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) help consumers make choices about the type of product they want to purchase by the amount of energy it consumes.
 
“Energy consumption and efficiency is front of mind for plenty of individuals and statistics show households can save 10% for each degree they decrease their air conditioners [2]. Minimum energy performance standards are an important tool in assisting consumers make choices about the product they want to install or use in their home,” said Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Institute of Refrigeration Air Conditioning and Heating (AIRAH), Tony Gleeson.
 
“Temperatures may be cooling, but the work we do in developing guidance to support consumer energy needs certainly is not. We are continuing to work alongside industry, regulators and government to develop standards to support the effective management of energy and producing guidance with an aim of protecting Australian consumers,” concluded Mr Chidgey.
 
[1] https://www.fire.nsw.gov.au/page.php?id=9201
[2] https://www.energy.gov.au/households/heating-and-cooling

Meg Cole-Adams

Public Affairs Officer 02 9237 6071

29 April 2020

Information for Australian manufacturers in the fight against COVID-19

Read more

23 April 2020

Plumbing industry faces flow on effect of COVID-19

Read more

2020-04-30
Location: Newsletter
Description:

In this Edition:

CEO report
A clear path for Australian manufacturers in the fight against COVID-19
Easing pressure on our health system
Getting access to AS 3959:2018
Plumbing industry faces flow on effect of COVID-19
Facilitating faster project completions through TGR
Smart standards for smarter cities
In conversation with Greg Ryan
International update
Sector update
Drafts open for comment
PEFC chain of custody standard: trademark and certification usage

CEO report

Australia continues to respond to the challenges of COVID-19, with many industries and community sectors managing massive disruption. At Standards Australia we have worked quickly at facilitating standards development remotely and adapting our processes so we can continue our core business of supporting industry, government and the wider Australian community.
 
The resilience and cooperation exhibited by the Australian people at the beginning of 2020 while responding to the bushfire crisis is again on show as we face this next challenge. It is encouraging to see so many Australian businesses and public sector organisations respond quickly to address urgent requirements of the health care sector.
 
Factories once making high-end clothing are now developing face masks and companies once making gin are now shifting to manufacturing hand sanitiser. To support this effort, earlier this month we released directory material for Australian manufacturers; this document is intended to help manufacturers find information on relevant standards, such as respiratory protection, surgical masks and gloves, quickly and effectively.
 
This month we also supported the #flattenthecurvehack, an exciting event in which teams brainstormed and developed solutions to the COVID-19 crisis. Winners included a 3D-printed adjustable face-shield and a new platform called ‘Class Party’ which provides a virtual reality learning experience for school children learning from home.
 
Hopefully, many of the ideas and solutions that came out of the event will be able to assist Australia and the world deal with current challenges. The #flattenthecurvehack is another instance of individuals and organisations working together and thinking outside the square to achieve practicable outcomes during this crisis – we are proud to have been involved.
 
In conjunction with continued standards development and collaboration across our thirteen sectors, the directory material and hackathon are just two examples of the different solutions and initiatives Standards Australia has actioned in an effort to effectively support industry, government and individuals during the COVID-19 crisis.
 
While we adjust to this new reality as a nation, Standards Australia is committed to continued productivity and effectiveness. I look forward to working with many of you in the months to come as we search for innovative solutions to the challenges 2020 is presenting.
—Adrian O'Connell, Chief Executive

A clear path for Australian manufacturers in the fight against COVID-19

Businesses looking to manufacture essential products have been given a helping hand with potential Australian-based testing and certification capabilities identified.
 
In addition to earlier guidance provided by Standards Australia identifying potentially relevant standards to manufacturers, this material prepared in consultation with the Australian Technical Infrastructure Alliance is a more detailed map of possible ways to get the gloves, masks, and surgical gowns from the warehouse to the frontline using Australian facilities.
 
Read more in our media release.

Easing pressure on our health system

At a time of great challenge for our national health system, amidst the crisis of COVID-19, the use of phone-based health services across Australia has been front and centre for a lot of people. 
To support consistency and confidence in the provision of health services over the phone, Standards Australia is encouraging those in the sector to look to AS 5205:2019, Australian Health Contact Centres, to assist our health system across Australia.

Read more in our media release.

Getting access to AS 3959:2018

AS 3959:2018, Construction in bushfire prone areas is now available at no cost through our distributors SAI Global and Techstreet. At Standards Australia we are proud to be able to offer this standard, alongside the Commonwealth Government, to assist the communities of Australia.

We encourage those rebuilding to download the document which will be available at no cost until June 2021. Please note to access the standard at no cost you must select the PDF option.

Plumbing industry faces flow on effect of COVID-19

An increase in the purchase of bidet products, which can help reduce toilet paper use, has seen the ACCC outline the dangers of individuals trying to install products themselves. Australia's independent consumer authority has reminded consumers these products should be certified through the WaterMark Certification Scheme and installed by a professional plumber.

Read more in our media release.

Facilitating faster project completions through TGR

In just one of many responses to our Technical Governance Review (TGR) we have introduced Technical Writers and Committee Facilitators as specialised resources for committees with large, complex or contentious work programs. This change means we can deliver the net benefit of projects more quickly by publishing in shorter timeframes.

In a recent example, Standards Australia Technical Writer, Louise Hodgins was assigned to the revision of a complex standard as alongside technical changes, the existing standard was to be split into three parts. This combination is normally difficult to deliver on schedule however, Professor David Eager, Chairperson of the relevant committee said, “The drafting of the three parts of AS 2316.1 has been improved immensely by having a dedicated Technical Writer involved from the get-go.”

There has been similar feedback from other committees working through difficult issues and complex documents who have utilised these resources.

At Standards Australia we are pleased to see the benefit of our TGR being realised and improving the effectiveness of our hard-working committees. A list of the projects currently underway is available on the Technical Governance Review Implementation Plan for FY 2020. You can also read about our progress in our latest quarterly report.

Smart standards for smarter cities

The adoption of three international smart cities standards is an exciting step forward for the future of Australian cities and regional towns.

The last few months, more than ever, have shown us cities and the larger Australian and International communities are facing varied challenges including, but not limited to, environmental changes, economic instability and population growth. These standards intend to provide clear criteria for cities to measure and compare their strengths and weaknesses in facing these challenges.

You can find out more about the adopted standards and the work of Standards Australia in this space in our recent blog update.

In conversation with Greg Ryan

Greg is the Director Business Excellence at the Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA). He has been with the Association for just over 6 years with oversight of all programs related to enhancing the business delivery to customers including asset management, digital, people and capability. Prior to working at WSAA, Greg worked for South East Water in Melbourne for over 13 years, and has a background in operations, management and strategic planning.

A key aspect of the work at WSAA is industry collaboration to develop clear guidance documents and codes, along with being a nominating organisation for development of standards relevant to the water sector. We use these documents to drive consistency and innovation in the industry and ensure the longevity and safety of installed products.
 
Standards Australia (SA): How long have you been involved in standards development?

Greg Ryan (GR): I have only been directly involved in standards development since starting at WSAA, so just over six years now.

SA: Is there a particular project or standard that sticks out to you?

GR: The key project that sticks out for me is the development of a national standard on products suitable for toilet flushing. It doesn’t sound very glamorous, however, the project has been very rewarding because it has involved developing a clear consensus among a diverse group of manufacturers, water utilities, consumer and manufacturer advocates and peak bodies. Through the process we have been able to achieve resolution on aspects which have been difficult to resolve overseas. I am quite pleased with how the Committee is able to work together to achieve an outcome that will provide greater benefit for the community.

SA: What is the role of standards in your sector?

GR: Standards apply to all aspects of a water utility’s operation including risk management, financial management and worker health and safety. They are particularly important for our infrastructure. The majority of our assets are buried within easements adjacent to customer properties. When they fail they can cause significant damage to property, inconvenience to customers and impact on the environment. Standards provide a level of confidence that installed products such as pipes, valves and meters are going to last and deliver the service required over their lifetime.
 
SA: With coronavirus affecting many industries across the country, what are some of the challenges facing the water and waste services sector?

GR: The initial challenge was ensuring the majority of staff were able to work effectively remotely, and that in doing so the workforce was not only safe but that their mental health was being looked after. Other challenges have been around social distancing and the need to undertake certain types of work such as lifting heavy objects or entering confined spaces, where the nature of the work means that social distancing can be impossible. This is combined with the current shortages of PPE such as face masks and hand sanitiser.
 
SA: What do you think is the future of standardisation?

GR: Standardisation provides a reliable means to confirm the durability and suitability of products for a given purpose. It is becoming more important for the water industry as we continue to lose local production capacity in areas such as steel manufacturing. This increases the amount of material sourced from overseas, placing more reliance on international standards. Hence a greater need for involvement in international mirror committees to support international standards development.
 
Separately, I see that there is an evolution coming in the way standards are developed, designed and presented. COVID-19 is expanding our view of what is possible through online collaboration, which hopefully will result in greater participation in standards development if there is less travel involved in meetings. But in the longer term the challenge is to make standards more relevant and easy to use for all. Some of the digital approaches are integrating images of a product or application with the relevant sections of particular standards. So that rather than reading the entirety of each standard it is possible to read only the relevant parts. This comes with challenges around creating context. However, it should hopefully increase engagement and the uptake of standards.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from April (PDF)

  • Establishment of two technical committees: ISO/TC 327 Natural stones and ISO/TC 328 Engineered stones
  • A safer way to approach water rescue with new ISO guidelines
  • Proposal for a new field of technical activity on child care articles

Sector update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

SDO News

PEFC chain of custody standard: trademark and certification usage

The 2020 revisions to PEFC documents below are now available:

  • Chain of Custody Standard (ST 2002);
  • Trademark use rules (ST 2001);
  • Certification body requirements for Chain of Custody (ST 2003).

PEFC has provided a detailed guidance document on the new standards and logo usage rules.
In summary, the following will apply:

  • The 2013 version of the PEFC chain of custody standard ST 2002 remains in force until August 14. For PEFC C-o-C holders, they will have until this date to comply with the 2020 version. An audit to the new standard is required before certification to the 2020 version of the PEFC C-o-C standard will be granted.
  • Certification bodies must be accredited to the 2020 version prior to audits being performed.
  • Certification bodies need to add the 2020 version of the PEFC International Chain of Custody Standard to their scope of accreditation. This requirement requires more specific mandatory training that Responsible Wood can provide.
2020-04-28
Location: Newsletter
Description:

News Alert - Information for Australian manufacturers in the fight against COVID-19

  • Businesses looking to manufacture essential products have been given a helping hand with potential Australian-based testing and certification capabilities identified.
  • Finding relevant standards, testing and certification capabilities might be a challenge for businesses but it is the focus of new information released today.
  • COVID-19 is changing industries and Standards Australia is supporting the change wherever possible.

 
In addition to earlier guidance provided by Standards Australia identifying potentially relevant standards to manufacturers, today’s material prepared in consultation with the Australian Technical Infrastructure Alliance is a more detailed map of possible ways to get the gloves, masks, and surgical gowns from the warehouse to the frontline using Australian facilities.
 
“Today’s announcement is a step further in not only helping manufacturers identify relevant standards but to get a potential pathway to market including avenues for testing and certification,” said CEO of Standards Australia, Adrian O’Connell. “The release of this latest guidance demonstrates how quickly we can move as an organisation when we are needed by industry, by governments and by the Australian public.”
 
“We have had tremendous support from Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand, National Association of Testing Authorities, and National Measurement Institute as well as, government and industry to identify barriers delaying essential PPE from hitting the frontlines where it is so desperately needed,” said Mr O’Connell. “Today’s publication is a huge achievement by all involved, but again it is not the end of this journey. There is still plenty expected of our manufacturing sector and we don’t want businesses out there going it alone – we are here to help as best we can.”
 
Providing avenues for potential conformance pathways for certain products is one way in which we can assist to join the pieces of the standards and conformance framework to make it easier for industry and domestic manufacturers to move forward and get to market.
 
“Seeing an entire industry jump and answer the call to arms from the Federal Government, as well as State Premiers is a great achievement that the entire Australian manufacturing sector should be proud of,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey. “We have set out to do our part to support Australia’s COVID-19 response, by providing information on potentially relevant Australian Standards® and corresponding test methods, as well as information on Australian laboratories and certifiers, which we aim to maintain with the Australian Technical Infrastructure Alliance involvement.”
 
“Standards Australia has a unique ability to understand market challenges, bring together relevant stakeholders and deliver solutions for industry and government,” said Mr Chidgey.
 
“But there is more to do against COVID-19, and we will continue to work closely with the governments’ COVID-19 taskforces and other stakeholders to assist as required.  We look forward to continuing to play a leading role in supporting the manufacturing sector here in Australia,” concluded Mr Chidgey. 

Our directory material can be found here.                   

Scott McGrath

Government Relation Manager

+ 612 9237 6044

Contact Name: Scott McGrath
Phone: +612 9237 6044
Address: 20 Bridge Street
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
URL: https://www.standards.org.au
Comments: GPO Box 476 Sydney NSW 2001 tel:+61 2 9237 6000
2020-04-07
Location: Newsletter
Description:
  • Manufacturers across Australia are shifting from their traditional work to help meet domestic shortfalls of essential products.
  • These new product lines may benefit from guidance available in the standards that have been developed by industry and governments, to support a quick shift into new areas.
  • The entire country is now deeply entrenched in the fight against COVID-19, with domestic manufacturing on a new frontline meeting shortfalls of essential products. The manufacturing of such products is often underpinned by standards, a summary list of which we have collated into an easy to read directory.
     
    “Our organisation has been shaping the landscape of Australian industry for nearly 100 years, and through every challenge we have faced as a nation we have risen in response,” said CEO of Standards Australia, Adrian O’Connell.
     
    “After the Second World War, standards were essential to the domestic market and have been enabling economic growth ever since. While the challenge we face today is different, the need for our domestic manufacturing is much the same and we are established to support Australian businesses as they strive to build essential domestic manufacturing capacity.”
     
    “Industry solutions to fulfil market and community needs have been the focus of our efforts for many years and in this case, we have been working to deliver support to the national response to COVID-19,” said Mr O’Connell.  
     
    The directory and industry reference material being released outlines information on standards that may be relevant to key areas of current domestic product shortfall, such as respiratory protection, surgical masks, gloves, and other protective clothing.
     
    “Standards Australia works with industry and government to manage over 7,000 standards and in this time of national crisis we don’t want people to be wasting their time trying to find certain information depending on their situation,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey.
     
    “Being able to switch from producing gin to hand sanitiser, or t-shirts to surgical gowns are priority for manufacturers and where their efforts should be focused, not trawling through our database for relevant standards.”
     
    “This is a first practical step among others Standards Australia is exploring, and we are excited by what it has the potential to achieve,” continued Mr Chidgey. “We are working with multiple levels of government, in different areas of work to respond to this situation to the extent that we can. We remain committed to taking practical steps to help our nation respond to this global pandemic.”
     
    Our directory material can be found here

Contact

Meg Cole-Adams

Public Affairs Officer

02 9237 6071

Sizzling Summer Standards

16 December 2019

Read more

An innovative future for Standards Australia

22 November 2019

Read more

2020-03-30
Location: Newsletter
Description:

IN THIS EDITION:

CEO report
There’s never been a more important time for Australian Standards
Standards Australia sets priorities for Artificial Intelligence
Each for Equal: IWD2020
Conversation with contributors
Standards Awards – Last chance to nominate
Rules for dispute avoidance and conflict resolution
Remote workshops
In conversation with Teresa Corbin
International update
Sector update
Draft open for comment
Responsible Wood update

CEO REPORT

The past month has been difficult and unprecedented for all Australians. The COVID-19 virus is affecting individuals, businesses and countries across the world. Our standards community has been impacted like many others and as a result we have now moved the organization online, with our staff working from home and our committee meetings being held remotely.

Standards Australia has been supporting the Australian people for nearly 100 years and this will not change. As a public purpose organization, we will stay both positive and productive. 

As part of our long-term digital transformation we have many of the systems in place that support remote work. These systems will help ensure effective communication and collaboration with colleagues nationally and internationally.

In these critical times the information provided in standards is an important tool in promoting safety, confidence and coordination. From business continuity and medical equipment to new innovative technologies like 5G, there are standards being developed and already available that will be particularly relevant to Australian industry and businesses over the coming months and years.

We are committed to maintaining momentum in the development of standards, staying connected and involved with our national and international community and engaging with the urgent needs that Australia has now.

This year is going to be radically different to anything we had imagined or planned for, with our nation facing serious health and economic challenges. Standards Australia will, as it has throughout its 98 year history, continue to work on behalf of industry and the Australian community to deliver the trusted solutions needed today and tomorrow.
—Adrian O'Connell, Chief Executive

There’s never been a more important time for Australian Standards

Standards Australia remains committed to working alongside business, government and the broader community in responding to COVID-19.
 
The speed and scope of our work must adapt to these challenging times, and so far we have proven we can measure up to the task ahead.
 
Read more about our COVID-19 response and plan in our latest statement.

STANDARDS AUSTALIA SETS PRIORITIES FOR ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Standards Australia has released Artificial Intelligence Standards Roadmap: Making Australia’s Voice Heard. The comprehensive report, commissioned by the Department of Industry, Science, Energy & Resources, provides recommendations to help Australia effectively support Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its future across the globe.

Read more in our media release

EACH FOR EQUAL: IWD2020

Here at Standards Australia we firmly believe an equal world is an enabled world. This International Women’s Day we were proud to celebrate by striking the #EachforEqual pose which we captured it in a short video.

We are committed to ensuring representation and balance across all levels of our business. To find out more about our commitment to promoting balance, read our Each for Equal blog.

CONVERSATION WITH CONTRIBUTORS

Standards Australia has a strong history of collaboration with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Last year, our very own General Manager of Operations, Kareen Riley-Takos was elected to the IEC Standardization Management Board (SMB), which acts as the technical governing body of the IEC.

On 5 May, Standards Australia invites you to participate in an information and consultation session, to be held remotely, on Australia’s participation at the International Electrotechnical Commission. Register on our website.

STANDARDS AWARDS-LAST CHANCE TO NOMINATE

There is still time to get in your nominations for the Standards Awards which close on Thursday 2 April 2020.
 
Standards Awards recognise and reward excellence in standardisation. Awards are presented to individuals, accredited SDOs and committees who have made a positive impact on standardisation.
 
Make your nomination today on the Standards Australia website.

RULES FOR DISPUTE AVOIDANCE AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION

In consultation with stakeholders and committees, Standards Australia has developed the Committee Dispute Avoidance and Resolution Standardisation Guide (SG-008).

This new guide provides strategies for minimising, and where possible avoiding, disputes that prevent consensus from being achieved between committee members. The guide also lays out the framework for proactively and effectively resolving disputes that could not be avoided.

The guide’s development is a significant part of our Technical Governance Review recommendations. It aims to address the need for improved processes and protocols for technical disagreements, escalation of problems and complaints, and mediation or resolution of problems. Stay tuned for further workshops and training for Committee Chairs, which will incorporate practical advice on how to apply the new guide.

You can find the guide under the Standardisation Guides on our website.

REMOTE WORKSHOPS

Please note that any workshops scheduled between now and 30 June 2020 will be delivered virtually.
 
If you are already registered for a scheduled workshop we will communicate full course details in the coming weeks, including the delivery method and date options along with supporting information on how to access the training to maximise your learning experience.
 
For any questions regarding this information, please contact your Project Manager, Stakeholder Engagement Manager or the Learning & Development team directly.

IN CONVERSATION WITH TERESA CORBIN

Teresa Corbin is a co-founder and now CEO of ACCAN, Australia’s peak body for communications consumers. She has many years of experience working in telecommunications policy both in Australia and internationally. Teresa is a director on the Board of the International Telecommunications Users Group (INTUG). In Australia she currently sits on several bodies including the ACMA Consumer Consultative Forum and she chairs Standards Australia’s Consumer Policy Committee. In 2015, she was awarded the Charles Todd Medal by the Telecommunications Society for having made an outstanding contribution in recent years. Teresa holds a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Linguistics from La Trobe University and is a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.
 
Standards Australia (SA): How did you become interested in standards development?

Teresa Corbin (TC): I was involved in the early days of organic food sales and the need to define and promote these products using standards. Now I am interested in the adoption of new technologies and the vital role that standards play.

SA: Why are consumer standards important?

TC: Consumer standards play an important role in helping the general public to trust that the products and services that they use day-to-day are fit for purpose. If people don’t trust an organisation and the safety of a product or service, they’re simply not going to use it.

SA: Do you think the broader community understand the role of standards?

TC: Generally, members of the public don’t have a comprehensive understanding of the role of standards. On the contrary, for the average consumer, the main concern is that the product or service works as promised and that it’s safe, but that doesn’t mean that they think that standards are important.

It’s commonly assumed that if a product or service is available for sale within Australia, then it meets the necessary standards and won’t cause harm. This speaks to the level of implicit trust that consumers have within our standards, even if they don’t know the details and specifications that a product or service had to meet to be fit for sale.

Consumer involvement in the standards-making process helps to increase awareness amongst the general community.

Some consumers are aware of standards and the role they play. We’re pleased that Standards Australia have committed to funding and providing free access to standards for personal, domestic or household use at no cost to end users in the future.

SA: What is the future of standardisation?

TC: As a consumer organisation, we see standards becoming more open for non-commercial users. This means more engagement with consumers throughout the standard development process so that the people who will ultimately be impacted by the product or service have the chance to have their voice heard in the establishment of appropriate standards.

With technology continuing to lead to convergence across industries, particularly in the telecommunications space, we’re likely to see greater collaboration between industries whose products and services become interconnected.

INTERNATIONAL UPDATE

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from March (PDF) 

  • WTO Trade Policy Review for Australia 
  • Proposal at ISO for new field of Technical Activity on Lithium one
  • IEC’s new standardisation approach for Circular Economies

SECTOR UPDATE

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

DRAFT OPEN FOR COMMENT

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

RESPONSIBLE WOOD UPDATE

PEFC approves revised standards

Three standards that further strengthen PEFC’s sustainability benchmarks and assist in safeguarding forests globally came into force in February.

Most notable are changes to the chain of custody standard, specifically the expansion of the definition of controversial sources.

Chain of custody establishes the link from the forest to the market, tracking forest-based material from sustainable sources to the final product.

The standard lays out the requirements that a company must meet to achieve PEFC chain of custody certification. This includes requirements to avoid “controversial sources” - material not to be used in certified products.

Independent audit for Responsible Wood

The Standards Development and Accreditation Committee (SDAC) has appointed an independent auditor to oversee Responsible Wood’s ‘check compliance’ to Standard Development Organisation (SDO) requirements.

According to Alan Snow, certification coordinator, the surveillance audit provides Responsible Wood with an opportunity to demonstrate to Standards Australia an ongoing commitment to standards development.

“With the endorsement of Standards Australia, consumers could take heart that products that carry the Responsible Wood logo were not only better for the forests but also better for all consumers,” CEO Simon Dorries said.

Standards Australia is the owner of the standards and trademarks and is one of five accredited SDOs licensed to develop Australian standards for forest certification through ongoing SDAC accreditation.

Revision of standard for forest management 

Responsible Wood has announced the revision of the Australian standard for sustainable forest management AS 4708.

Responsible Wood is an accredited Standard Development Organisation.

AS 4708 specifies the environmental, economic, social and cultural requirements that must be met to demonstrate good practice and continued improvement towards sustainable forest management.

Responsible Wood reviews the standard every five years and undertaken in conjunction with Standards New Zealand to develop a joint Australian-NZ standard for forest management in both countries.

 

2020-02-28
Description:

In this Edition:

CEO report
Key bushfire standard open for all Australians to access
Farming communities helping shape safety standard
Lifting the crane industry to new heights
AI Roundtable
Graduate intake
National Blockchain Roadmap release
Standards Awards 2020 – nominate now
In conversation with Geoff Boughton
International update
Sector update
Drafts open for comment

CEO REPORT

Australia is beginning the recovery process and focussing on the year ahead. Earlier this month, Standards Australia announced, in partnership with the Commonwealth government, an initiative to fund access to AS 3959 for all Australians. This standard will help our communities build back better and more resilient housing.
 
This initiative was made possible because of the important changes to the Distribution and Licensing Framework and highlights the opportunity Standards Australia has to support important national initiatives in Australia.
 
On behalf of Board and staff of Standards Australia, I would like to congratulate two of our committee members for receiving the honour of Officer and Member of the Order of Australia. Dr Geoff Boughton and Catherine Inglis were both recognised for their respective contributions to their fields. This is a great celebration of their work and service and speaks to the quality of expertise involved in standards development.
 
Standards are vital to the growth and sustainability of our country and will impact many facets of Australian lives. To help continue to develop valuable and effective standards, the innovation Incubator is filled with some smart projects, helping us take standards development to the next level.
 
Innovation is a key focus for Standards Australia and this month we hosted a roundtable to discuss the future of artificial intelligence technology in Australia and around the globe. This is a huge step for AI and will be instrumental in the implementation of this technology across many sectors. Standards Australia looks forward to the official road map launch in a few weeks' time.
 
Lastly, the Standards Awards are open, and we encourage you to nominate any individuals who have made an important contribution to standards development. These awards are a celebration of the value members add to Standards Australia and the importance of their commitment to the ongoing standards development process.
—Adrian O'Connell, Chief Executive

Key bushfire standard open for all Australians to access

Standards Australia alongside Karen Andrews MP, Minister for Industry, Science and Technology recently announced a joint funding agreement for access to AS 3959:2018, Construction of buildings in bushfire-prone areas. 

By funding access to this standard together with the Commonwealth Government, Standards Australia hopes that as communities rebuild after these most recent bushfires, they do so with the support of this standard.

Read more in our media release.

Lifting the crane industry to new heights

The number of cranes across city blocks and in suburban streets has skyrocketed in recent years, and with this increased use, the consultation on over 20 draft standards could not be better timed.
 
The Standards Australia technical committee responsible for these draft standards has progressed several projects to public comment. These draft standards seek to align Australian safety guidance to that of the international crane industry.
Read more in our media release.

AI Roundtable

Standards Australia was pleased to host the Standard Council of Canada, Tobias Feakin – Australia’s Cyber Affairs Ambassador and other stakeholders at an Artificial Intelligence (AI) Roundtable earlier this month.

The potential of this innovative technology is broad, and standards will be an integral part of its future responsible implementation in both Australia and across the rest of the world. Standards Australia looks forward to working alongside industry and other standards bodies in creating relevant, best-practice standards for this technology.

Graduate intake

February marks the first month of our Graduate Program at Standards Australia.

Four graduates joined us from different industry studies to learn more about standards development. In an exciting first, the graduates will spend time in four divisions across the business to understand and work on the ins and outs of Standards Australia.

Emma Lowes, Head of Human Resources at Standards Australia, said "the program marks the beginning of an incredible opportunity for Standards Australia to cultivate a profile amongst the next generation."

"We have the foundations in place to teach the graduates more about our industry and the value of standards to the Australian community, but we also have the chance to seek a different viewpoint on how we run as a company and changes we could make to be better."

Applications for our 2021 graduate program open in July 2020 for our February intake.

National Blockchain Roadmap release

Earlier this month the Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources released the National Blockchain Roadmap. The roadmap highlights the opportunities that exist in Australia and includes the huge potential and importance of standardisation within the space.

We are proud to have worked alongside the Department in their development of this roadmap and look forward to further work in supporting this technology reach its full potential.

Standards Awards 2020 – nominate now

Each year, Standards Australia takes time out to recognise outstanding contributions to our work as Australia’s national standards body.

Individual and committee efforts are recognised as well as service in Australia and internationally.

Nominations for the Standards Awards can be made on the Standards Australia website.

Nominations close on Thursday 2 April 2020.

In conversation with Geoff Boughton       

Geoff is an experienced structural engineer who has been involved in standards development for nearly 40 years. He is dedicated to improving the built environment against the impact of extreme weather conditions, by participating in development and revision of building standards. He is a member of the Australasian Wind Engineering Society and a research fellow and adjunct associate professor at James Cook University’s Cyclone Testing Station.

Geoff was recently appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in the Australia Day 2020 Honours List for significant service to engineering and professional bodies.

Standards Australia: Why did you first get involved in standards development?

Geoffrey Boughton (GB): Getting involved in standards was a natural extension of my work with the Cyclone Testing Station, where we focused on understanding how buildings were able to resist the loads placed on them in extreme wind events.

SA: Do you think standards can play a role in protecting and building resilient communities across Australia?

GB: They certainly do. When we compare the levels of damage sustained by buildings constructed to the current suite of standards with those constructed to older standards, there is a significant difference in performance. In part, this is due to deterioration of older buildings, but it is also a function of the structural features required to comply with the contemporary standards. For example, in the past many buildings were constructed with nails securing battens to rafters, but current standards require significantly stronger connections, particularly in cyclone-prone areas. We still find houses that have significant roof damage in wind events were those that had battens nailed to rafters.

The above is a simple example, but it underlines the fact that standards are written to ensure that the minimum standard of construction required in the National Construction Code (NCC) give buildings a good chance of protecting life and safety of the occupants. Of course, they set a minimum standard, but if owners choose to build to a higher level, then it can significantly increase their building’s level of resilience.

SA: How have building standards changed in your 40 years of experience?

GB: Australian building standards have changed in a number of different ways over the years. Standards now recognise that most users have access to computers, so design calculations can be much more complex and give a result that more fairly presents the loads for particular design scenarios. The presentation of standards for viewing on phones and tablets makes them much more accessible on building sites.

The writing or revision of standards has however become much more complex, particularly if the standards are referenced in the NCC. Justification of even minor changes require significant cost-benefit analyses, which presents challenges in finding data on design events that have a very low probability of occurring. This is particularly difficult when considering the rapid changes that are happening within building practice, and the potential effects of climate change.

SA: What do you think is the future of standardisation?

GB: Developing resilience of building stock through safe and effective building standards is a powerful tool for fostering community resilience. Revisions of standards will need to be quickly developed and implemented to keep pace with rapid changes in materials, construction practices and climate change, so that new buildings can meet the expected loads over their lifetimes. There is also a continuing need for voices in standards committees that strongly represent the community interests and initiate and press for change when required.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from February (PDF)

Free IEC webinar on Circular Economy

Sector update     

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

2020-02-03
Location: Australia
Description:

E-News selected content applicable to power electronics

Sector Updates

Consumer Products, Services & Safety

[There were no new information applicable for Power Electronics covering projects and publications between 01 December 2019 to 31 January 2020. AA/SCDB/PSMA. following information

Sector Updates

Communications, Information Technology & e-Commerce Services

The following information covers projects and publications between 01 December 2019 to 31 January 2020. There were no new projects approved for development or drafts for public comment for this sector this month (February 2020).

Recent Publications

All publications may be purchased from our distributors, Standards Australia Webstore (powered by Techstreet), and SAI Global.

Software, systems and enterprise - Architecture processes
Product designation: AS ISO/IEC/IEEE 42020:2019
Abstract: The objective of this Standard is to establish a set of process descriptions for the governance and management of a collection of architectures and the architecting of entities. This document also establishes an enablement process description that provides support to these other architecture processes.
History: First published as AS ISO/IEC/IEEE 42020:2019.
 
Modelling and simulation - Framework of related standards
Product designation: SA HB 116:2019
Abstract: This Handbook provides guidance on concepts and Standards that may apply to Modelling and Simulation practitioners in their day-to-day lives.
History: ​Originated as SA HB 116:2014. Second edition 2019.

Withdrawals and Reconfirmations

For a list of aged Australian Standards® that are proposed for withdrawal or reconfirmation, please refer to our Aged Standards Review page.

Proposed Withdrawals

No publications are currently open for consultation for their proposed withdrawal in this Sector.

Withdrawals

Vehicles, boats and internal combustion engines - Radio disturbance characteristics - Limits and methods of measurement for the protection of on-board receivers
Product designation: AS/NZS CISPR 25-2010

 

Information technology - Security techniques - Key management - Mechanisms using symmetric techniques
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 11770.2-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Key management - Mechanisms using asymmetric techniques
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 11770.3-2008
 
Information technology-Security techniques - Key management - Mechanisms based on weak secrets
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 11770.4-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - IT network security - Network security management
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 18028.1-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - IT network security - Securing communications across networks using virtual private networks
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 18028.5-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Encryption algorithms - Asymmetric ciphers
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 18033.2-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Entity authentication - Mechanisms using symmetric encipherment algorithms
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 9798.2-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Entity authentication - Mechanisms using digital signature techniques
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 9798.3-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Entity authentication - Mechanisms using a cryptographic check function
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 9798.4-2008

Ref.: https://www.standards.org.au/engagement-events/sectors/communications-information-technology-e-commerce/sector-updates-communications,-information-techn

2020-01-31
Location: Australia
Description:

E-News selected content applicable to power electronics

Consumer Products, Services & Safety

[There were no new information applicable for Power Electronics covering projects and publications between 01 December 2019 to 31 January 2020. AA/SCDB/PSMA. following information

Sector Updates

Communications, Information Technology & e-Commerce Services

The following information covers projects and publications between 01 December 2019 to 31 January 2020. There were no new projects approved for development or drafts for public comment for this sector this month (February 2020).

Recent Publications

All publications may be purchased from our distributors, Standards Australia Webstore (powered by Techstreet), and SAI Global.

Software, systems and enterprise - Architecture processes
Product designation: AS ISO/IEC/IEEE 42020:2019
Abstract: The objective of this Standard is to establish a set of process descriptions for the governance and management of a collection of architectures and the architecting of entities. This document also establishes an enablement process description that provides support to these other architecture processes.
History: First published as AS ISO/IEC/IEEE 42020:2019.
 
Modelling and simulation - Framework of related standards
Product designation: SA HB 116:2019
Abstract: This Handbook provides guidance on concepts and Standards that may apply to Modelling and Simulation practitioners in their day-to-day lives.
History: ​Originated as SA HB 116:2014. Second edition 2019.

Withdrawals and Reconfirmations

For a list of aged Australian Standards® that are proposed for withdrawal or reconfirmation, please refer to our Aged Standards Review page.

Proposed Withdrawals

No publications are currently open for consultation for their proposed withdrawal in this Sector.

Withdrawals

Vehicles, boats and internal combustion engines - Radio disturbance characteristics - Limits and methods of measurement for the protection of on-board receivers
Product designation: AS/NZS CISPR 25-2010

Information technology - Security techniques - Key management - Mechanisms using symmetric techniques
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 11770.2-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Key management - Mechanisms using asymmetric techniques
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 11770.3-2008
 
Information technology-Security techniques - Key management - Mechanisms based on weak secrets
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 11770.4-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - IT network security - Network security management
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 18028.1-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - IT network security - Securing communications across networks using virtual private networks
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 18028.5-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Encryption algorithms - Asymmetric ciphers
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 18033.2-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Entity authentication - Mechanisms using symmetric encipherment algorithms
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 9798.2-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Entity authentication - Mechanisms using digital signature techniques
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 9798.3-2008
 
Information technology - Security techniques - Entity authentication - Mechanisms using a cryptographic check function
Product designation: AS/NZS ISO/IEC 9798.4-2008

Ref.: https://www.standards.org.au/engagement-events/sectors/communications-information-technology-e-commerce/sector-updates-communications,-information-techn

2020-01-31
Location: Australia
Description:

Wiring rules refined

AS/NZS 3000:2018, Electrical Installations, also known as the Wiring Rules, has been updated.

“The wiring rules contributes heavily to Australian life through its guidance in the design, construction and verification of electrical installations,” said General Manager of Strategy and Engagement, Adam Stingemore.

The amendment includes several changes to the 2018 publication, including:

  • Clarification of sections Service Protective Device and Common Areas
  • Updates to sections Luminaires, Appliances and Other Electrical Equipment and Special Electrical Installations
  • References now include AS/NZS 5139, Electrical Installations – Safety of battery systems for use with power conversion equipment

 “This is an important standard for many within the electrical sector, with the protection and safety of workers at its core.”

“With the support of relevant stakeholders and industry, Standards Australia remains committed to keeping this standard up-to-date as we help build a safer and more resilient Australia,” concluded Mr. Stingemore.
 
The Amendment is available through Standards Australia’s website and directly from SAI Global and Techstreet.

Contact

General Manager, Strategy and Public Affairs

+612 9237 6086

2020-01-29
Location: Australia
Description:

In a country affected by extreme weather conditions, it is important powerlines are suitably resistant to the exposure of extreme climate conditions and designed in a safe and consistent manner.
 
Standards Australia has recently released SA/SNZ HB 331:2020, Overhead line design handbook that guides the design, construction and maintenance of overhead power lines.
 
“This comprehensive handbook considers the many different locations and weather patterns of our country,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey. “Having resilient and safe power lines is essential in powering communities across Australia, and this handbook is another tool to help achieve this goal.”
 
The handbook has been updated with some significant additions, including safety clear zones, vegetation management, high voltage live working considerations and the design and construction of powerlines in bushfire prone areas.
 
“Australia has been devastated by the ongoing bushfires in several states,” said Mr. Chidgey. “As an organisation, Standards Australia will continue to support industry and government through guidance, such as this handbook, that considers the specific needs of current and future infrastructure in these affected areas.”
 
From the materials used in the design to targeted inspection and maintenance, the bushfire prone areas section of the handbook sets out requirements aimed at reducing the risk of ignition from powerlines.
 
“Alongside industry, governments and others, Standards Australia is committed to providing standards and similar documents that protect the infrastructure of communities, in turn building a more resilient Australia,” concluded Mr. Chidgey.

Supporting a secure digital economy

22 January 2020

Read more

Button batteries to receive new guidance

06 November 2019

Read more

 

2020-01-20
Location: Australia
Description:

In a country affected by extreme weather conditions, it is important powerlines are suitably resistant to the exposure of extreme climate conditions and designed in a safe and consistent manner.
 
Standards Australia has recently released SA/SNZ HB 331:2020, Overhead line design handbook that guides the design, construction and maintenance of overhead power lines.
 
“This comprehensive handbook considers the many different locations and weather patterns of our country,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey. “Having resilient and safe power lines is essential in powering communities across Australia, and this handbook is another tool to help achieve this goal.”
 
The handbook has been updated with some significant additions, including safety clear zones, vegetation management, high voltage live working considerations and the design and construction of powerlines in bushfire prone areas.
 
“Australia has been devastated by the ongoing bushfires in several states,” said Mr. Chidgey. “As an organisation, Standards Australia will continue to support industry and government through guidance, such as this handbook, that considers the specific needs of current and future infrastructure in these affected areas.”
 
From the materials used in the design to targeted inspection and maintenance, the bushfire prone areas section of the handbook sets out requirements aimed at reducing the risk of ignition from powerlines.
 
“Alongside industry, governments and others, Standards Australia is committed to providing standards and similar documents that protect the infrastructure of communities, in turn building a more resilient Australia,” concluded Mr. Chidgey.

Supporting a secure digital economy

22 January 2020

Read more

Button batteries to receive new guidance

06 November 2019

Read more

 

2019-12-19
Location: Australia
Description:

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.
Highlights from December (PDF)

Building resilient cities with new international standards

Report shows trade restrictions by WTO members at historically high levels

2019-12-15
Location: Australia
Description:

Sizzling Summer Standards

  • Aussies love a trip to the beach, a summer evening barbeque or an afternoon swim but many of us don’t realize the number of standards we rely on to keep us safe.
  • Standards Australia creates standards to help products work the way they’re expected to.
    The Australian Summer is an iconic part of the Aussie lifestyle but did you know that some of our favourite summer pastimes include a range of standards designed to keep us safe? They affect everything from the fans keeping you cool to your coolest pair of sunnies. 
    Standards Australia has been developing standards that contribute to the Australian summer lifestyle for almost 100 years. It’s more Australian than a Sunday barbeque or a game of beach cricket. Here are some of the most iconic Australian standards that are necessary to ensure we all enjoy a great summer – standards are everywhere. 
    You can’t Slip, Slop, Slap without sunscreen, and AS/NZS 2604:2012 Sunscreen products - Evaluation and classification sets out procedures for determining the performance of sunscreen products in terms of their mean protection factors.
    This standard has been essential for determining SPF standards in Australia, and forms an invaluable understanding for consumers about what they’re paying for.
    If you’re swimming at Bondi or Cottesloe Beach you will have seen safety flags designed to give swimmers information about hazards in the water and how they should act. There’s a high chance these signs are governed by ISO 20712-3:2014 – water safety signs and beach safety flags.
    But if you spend your summer indoors with a good book or re-watching Game of Thrones to remind you that winter is coming, you’ll find comfort in AS/NZS 3823.2-2013 – Performance of electrical appliances – air conditioners and heat pumps as well as AS/NZS 4020:2018, Testing of products for use in contact with drinking water to help you stay cool. 
    Last but not least, if you’re a weekend warrior looking to grill some snags, AS/NZS 5263.1.7:2016 Gas appliances - Domestic outdoor gas barbecues is your best friend. This standard aims to keep your barbeque safe to use on a hot summer’s day.
    These are just a few of the standards that feed into the Australian summer. Standards have been helping products and services work how they’re supposed to for nearly 100 years thanks to Standards Australia, and the work they do means you can spend more time enjoying the summer sun.
  •  
  • Contact
  • Meg Cole-Adams
  • Public Affairs Office
  • 02 9237 6071

Related News

An innovative future for Standards Australia

22 November 2019

Read more

 

 

2019-11-28
Location: Newsletter
Description:

In this Edition:

CEO report
An innovative future for Standards Australia
Board of Directors for 2020
Button Batteries to receive new guidance
Standards for ageing societies
Nominating Organisation Forums 2019
Zooming ahead
In conversation with Barbara Geens
Drafts open for comment
International update
Sector update

CEO report

I’m pleased to announce that on 22 November, in conjunction with the Annual General Meeting, Standards Australia launched its Distribution and Licensing Policy Framework (PDF). This document has been a year in the making and is an important step forward for Standards Australia and the distribution of our content.

To ensure a wide range of viewpoints were considered, earlier this year, we visited every capital city to consult and discuss the shape this document should take – it’s great to now be able to share the policy with all of you.

The document outlines the commitment of the organisation to partner with additional distributors to improve access to standards. With innovation front of mind, this framework will help future partners deliver standards in new and different ways. It is time for us to move beyond PDFs and consider the different platforms and formats in which standards can be utilised.

Another notable part of this policy is Standard Australia’s wish to fund access to content for personal, domestic and household use. This is an important step we are committed to working toward by no later than December 2023.

The launch of this pivotal policy comes at no better time, with the new year ahead and partnerships in the pipeline, 2020 is going to be a year of great change and development for the organisation.

Launching this document at the Annual General Meeting gave Standards Australia the chance to share and discuss next steps with our Councillors and Members. I would like to thank all of them for their continued support and contribution to this policy.

As we move on as a company, we look forward to this new era at Standards Australia. We are excited to take next steps in encouraging innovation, engaging with distributors and importantly, opening access to standards for Australian communities.
—Adrian O'Connell, Chief Executive Officer

An innovative future for Standards Australia

A little over a year ago, Standards Australia set out to put in place a framework that would allow for its content to be used more broadly and in innovative ways across the economy. Standards Australia has now launched its distribution and licensing framework (PDF) to encourage partnerships in the use of its content.

“We have been on this journey for over 5 years and it’s great to be staking the ground and actively encouraging the use of our content in new and different ways,” said CEO of Standards Australia, Adrian O’Connell. “The policy framework has innovation at its core. We are excited about the opportunities to deliver even more value to end users.”

Read more in our media release.

Board of Directors for 2020

Earlier this month it was announced that three members were elected into the Standards Australia Board of Directors. Directors act for a term of three years and are elected by the Standards Australia Council which comprises of government bodies, industry representatives and consumer organisations.
 
We are pleased to announce the re-appointment of Ms Michelle Fitzgerald, and welcome to the Board Dr Marlene Kanga AM and Dr Ian Opperman.
 
This will be Michelle Fitzgerald’s second term sitting on the board for Standards Australia. We are excited to welcome Dr Kanga and Dr Opperman into this position who both offer incredible professional experience.

Standards Australia would like to congratulate our three elected members and to thank our outgoing members David Singleton AM and James Tinslay for their continued commitment and work over the last few years.

Button Batteries to receive new guidance

Leaders from the consumer, services and product industries came together with Standards Australia recently to agree on the development of a button battery standard.

This decision follows an increase of concerned communities as the use of button batteries continues to rise in Australia. Known for being in children’s toys, button batteries can now be found in a much wider range of consumer products and are also sold as a standalone product.

Read more in our media release

Standards for ageing societies

By 2050, 1 in 6 people will be over the age of 65 globally; this statistic highlights the importance of having standards in place to support ageing societies at a national and international level.

The Australian Government, through its Economic Diplomacy Fund, in association with Standards Australia supported a workshop at the Australian Association of Gerontology Conference, to raise the profile of standardisation matters related to the APEC region’s growing silver economy. The workshop Standardisation in Ageing Societies: National and International Standards Development focused on boosting ageing societies and driving innovation to improve quality of life.

This conference also coincided with the 4th plenary meeting of the ISO Technical Committee for Ageing Societies (ISO/TC 314) since its establishment in late 2017. The committee is busy developing a range of international standards, including ISO 23633 Ageing societies – Guidelines for an age inclusive workforce and ISO 23617 Ageing societies – Framework for Dementia-inclusive communities.
 
2020 will include continued work on these standards and potential new work items for the committee. Standards Australia looks forward to working with Australian experts, our mirror committee and ISO/TC 317 to continue supporting ageing societies at home and abroad.

Nominating Organisation Forums 2019

Our Nominating Organisation forums are an important platform for stakeholders to come together to give Standards Australia feedback, share learnings and help our organisation work more effectively.
 
Aside from an update on what is happening at Standards Australia, the main focus of the forums was providing training on our updated Nominating Organisation Guide, which can be found on our website (PDF). 
 
The Outcomes Report from the forums is also available (PDF) and highlights the active engagement and productive discussions had across Melbourne and Sydney.
 
Nominating Organisations are an essential part of our processes; thanks for a fantastic year and Standards Australia looks forward to continued work in 2020.

Contributor corner

Zooming ahead

Following a successful internal launch and testing with various committees, Standards Australia is currently transitioning from Skype for Business to Zoom. This change aims to improve presentation and screen sharing and is a new and improved communication channel for remote participants.

It is important that committee members load the Zoom Web App (using the link provided by your Project Manager), escalate any connectivity issues and test your Zoom access before your next meeting.

We appreciate your assistance and understanding during this transition. FAQ’s and information on joining a meeting can be found on the Zoom website. If you have any questions or concerns please don’t hesitate to contact your Project Manager.

In conversation with Barbara Geens

Barbara is a Quality and Product Safety Manger at a major retailer and has extensive experience in standards development. She is a participating member on a range of Standards Australia committees that mainly centre around consumer interests. This includes being Chair of the Industry Working Group on Button Battery Safety and sitting on the ISO COPOLCO mirror committee which focuses on the most effective areas for consumer participation in standards.

Standards Australia (SA): Why did you get involved in standards development?
Barbara Geens (BG): I have long been interested in Product Safety Policy Advocacy and use a range of standards in my work. My motivation to get involved started from wanting to better understand the standards development process. I was inspired to become a “voice” for industry to develop practical solutions to enable better safety outcomes from consumer products.
 
SA: Why are product safety standards important?
BG: Product safety standards provide industry and regulators with a clear and aligned view on identified hazards and aid preventative approaches, these standards are an important benchmark for minimum safety requirements. Well-developed standards are a great tool for a wide range of industry stakeholders to refer to and work with.
 
SA: You recently presented at a forum on button batteries, what were the outcomes of this event? 
BG: I presented in my role of Chair of the Button Battery Safety Industry Working Group. The forum demonstrated that a wide range of industry, medical and consumer advocacy stakeholders recognise the importance of improving the safety of consumer products that use button batteries and replacement battery safety. The forum marked the start of the development process for a horizontal product safety standard – we hope this standard can be developed quickly and effectively.
 
SA: What is the future of standardisation?
BG: Standards are developed by diverse stakeholder committees and provide a documented, agreed way of seeing a topic and a path of addressing that topic. Going forward this will be especially important internationally, no one nation has all the expertise and answers for increasingly complex problems.
 
My participation on the COPOLCO Mirror Committee (CMC) has shown me the value of standardisation and international engagement across numerous topics, such as artificial intelligence, data security, product safety, climate change and sustainability. I think the future of standardisation will involve more collaboration at an international level.
 
SA: Do you think consumers understand the work involved in developing a standard?
BG: Unfortunately, many consumers do not understand how much work is involved in the development of standards. I believe many are also unaware the vast majority of contributors are industry volunteers. Many volunteers, including myself, are lucky to be supported by their employers and nominating organisations.

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from November (PDF)

  • WTO members discuss product quality, safety and standards, debate new trade concerns
  • Establishment of Technical Committee ISO/TC 326 – Machinery intended for use with foodstuffs
  • JTC1 Plenary begins in New Delhi

Sector update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

22 November 2019

2019-11-06
Location: Australia
Description:

Button batteries to receive new guidance

Leaders from the consumer, services and product industry came together at Standards Australia recently to agree on the development of a button battery standard.
 
This decision follows an increase of concerned communities as the use of button batteries continues to rise in Australia. Known for being in children’s toys, button batteries can now be found in a much wider range of consumer products and are also sold as a standalone product.
 
“The outcome of this forum of members of the public, industry bodies and regulators including the Australian Consumer and Competition Commission (ACCC), confirmed concerns around button batteries and the need to provide further guidance to address button batteries issues in a measured approach,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement Daniel Chidgey.  
 
“While there are some standards that reference these batteries, there is not yet any holistic guidelines for products with button batteries,” said Mr Chidgey. 
 
“Button batteries can be found in a range of items including thermometers, remote controls, children’s toys and novelty items,” said Ms Barbara Geens, Chair of the Industry Working Group on Button Batteries Safety. “The goal of this proposed standard is to create a unified approach for safer use and distribution of these batteries which is an essential step in protecting consumers.”
 
“This is an example of Standards Australia proactively working with industry, government and the public to provide the right standards solutions to equip the consumer products, services and safety sector. We look forward to continuing to work with industry and the Australian community in developing this pivotal guidance,” concluded Mr. Chidgey.

Contact

Meg Cole-Adams

Public Affairs Officer

02 9237 6071

2019-10-30
Location: Australia
Description:

In this Edition:

Chief Executive report
Positive new standard for battery storage sector
Smart publications for smart contracts
Wonderful world of standards (day)
Getting on – aged standards consultation closing 20 December
In conversation with Rachelle Doyle
International update
Sector update
Drafts open for comment
Rail safety: call for development group members

 

Chief Executive report

Our commitment to the future of the energy and electrotechnology sector at both a national and international level is a key driver for our work with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Together with our stakeholders we strive to innovate and deliver outcomes for the sector as a core part of our work as the national standards body.

This was on display at the IEC General Meeting (GM) in Shanghai, China. Now in its 83rd year, Australia was well represented both by Standards Australia staff but also by over 30 delegates from industry who contributed to governance and technical meetings, and a number of workshops. The IEC GM also provided an opportunity for Standards Australia to connect with many of our international counterparts. Building our connections and understanding challenges and initiatives in other countries helps us to ensure we share and learn how to make standards development more efficient and expedient.

The theme for this year’s IEC GM was ‘better quality, better life – reliability, safety, efficiency’, meaning there was plenty of discussion around innovation, diversity and inclusivity and the challenges of adapting in our rapidly evolving world. Another big focus of this year’s meeting was the next generation of standards developers. The IEC held several workshops attended by Australian delegates, including two Australians participating in the IEC Young Professionals program. Standards Australia staff were also part of a panel on attracting and training new experts in which we highlighted our work on NEXTgen, our stakeholder engagement approach and the training of committee members and staff.

I’m pleased to announce that Kareen Riley-Takos, General Manager Operations was elected to the IEC Standardization Management Board (SMB). The SMB is a key decision-making body for the IEC with responsibility for approving standards development projects, technical committees and appointing chairs, and liaising and maintaining relationships with other international organisations. In her appointment, Kareen will be supported by Beer Opatswan, who currently works for Energy Queensland and is a former IEC Young Professional. This is a great result for Australia and the IEC and is a testament to the instrumental work of our organisation and people at an international level.

While the year is drawing to a close, the work of Standards Australia continues with the 2019 Annual General Meeting being held in late November. This will give us the opportunity to present the year in full, hear from our councillors and members and discuss the future of our Distribution and Licensing Policy Framework. We look forward to updating our stakeholders and the public on the outcomes of the meeting and sharing next steps as we move into a new year and a new decade.

—Adrian O'Connell, Chief Executive Officer

Positive new standard for battery storage sector

A gap in safety guidance for the battery storage sector has been filled with the publication of AS/NZS 5139:2019, Electrical installations – Safety of battery systems for use with power conversion equipment.

In recognition of the need for an installation standard for battery storage devices in Australia, Standards Australia worked with industry, government and the broader community, to develop a standard to support the home battery storage industry and safety of the consumer.

Given there has never been an Australian standard for this new technology, developing this guidance has been a huge task and is a testament to the dedication of those involved.

Read more in our media release.

Smart publications for smart contracts

Smart contracts are self-executing contracts, they can automate and authenticate processes where it is important for the participants in a process to be able to rely on and trust steps or conditions in a supply chain or exchange. These innovative legal and digital instruments, are the focus of a recent Technical Report published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

Australia played an instrumental leadership role in developing the report, initially proposing the area of work internationally and managing the secretariat of the ISO Technical Committee responsible for the report.

Read more in our media release

Wonderful world of standards (day)

World Standards Day recognises the instrumental work of standards around the world, including the large number of experts and organisations that contribute to their development. On October 14 Standards Australia celebrated the day, alongside standards organisations across the globe.

The theme for this year was ‘video standards create a global stage’. To recognise the work of standards within this space we developed a short video – we hope you enjoy. You can learn more about the day, theme and history on the ISO website

Getting on – aged standards consultation closing 20 December

To ensure our content continues to serve the Australian public, we are currently seeking feedback on a number of aged standards (documents over ten years old), for which no existing active committee is available to provide input.

You can view the aged standards open for review on our Aged Standards Review page If you find standards still used by your industry or community please let us know by Friday 20 December 2019.

In conversation with Rachelle Doyle

Rachelle Doyle joined Woodside Energy in 2016 and is currently managing Woodside’s Energy Transformation Technology Program.  In addition to this busy professional life, Rachelle is also the chair of Standards Australia’s ME-093 Hydrogen Technologies committee.
 
Rachelle has a Bachelor of Chemical Engineering from Curtin University and is a Fellow of the Institute of Chemical Engineers. With more than 20 years’ experience working across multiple industries she has held a variety of roles in areas including engineering, operations, project management and commissioning. Rachelle also has experience in technology development and implementation and strategic improvement projects for process safety.

Standards Australia (SA): How long have you been involved in standards development?
Rachelle Doyle (RD): I’ve been engaged with standards and regulation development through provision of subject matter input over the past 15 years. Participation in ME-093 Hydrogen Technologies is my first formal involvement in standards adoption and development. It’s a privilege to work with the ME-093 committee and working group members on a topic that will help with the creation of a hydrogen domestic and export industry in Australia

SA: What is an unexpected use of hydrogen?
RD: There are so many emerging uses for hydrogen. You can purchase hydrogen powered drones which have an onboard storage capacity and fuel cell which enables longer flight time. There are ferries and trains operating already and even a small aeroplane model. We will continue to see new uses of hydrogen as people continue to discover innovative ways it can be utilised.

SA: How can standards assist as the use of hydrogen grows more popular?
RD: Standards are critical to ensure safe adoption of hydrogen in new market and end use segments. While hydrogen is not new, outside the industrial setting generation and end use application is changing and standards need to be updated or developed to cover these new areas, such as hydrogen refuelling stations. Timely delivery of the standards will be essential for Australia’s hydrogen economy.

SA: What do you think the future of standardisation looks like?
RD: The full value of standardisation is realised when global harmonisation is achieved where practical, as it provides an environment where suppliers can provide best value and end users have confidence in the safety of the products. The rate of change in technology is faster than ever before and effective standardisation will require a nimble approach to development and updates so that we can make use of the innovations in a shorter time frame.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from October (PDF):

  • Proposal to establish an ISO Technical Committee on surfaces with biocidal and antimicrobial properties
  • Getting the packaging right: International Guide just updated
  • WTO members engage in exploratory talks on market access for environmental services

Sector update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

SDO News

Rail safety: call for development group members

The Rail Industry Safety and Standards Board (RISSB) is seeking nominations for people to join RISSB development groups. Those nominated will be tasked with developing two new infrastructure products.

  • Asset management systems utilised for condition monitoring of rail infrastructure
  • Reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) for the Australian rail industry

You can read more about the development groups, infrastructure products and how to contribute on the RISSB website. Closing date for nominations are Friday, 1 November 2019

2019-09-03
Location: Australia
Description:

Road safety at the centre of auto glazing revision

With road safety a constant concern across the country, the glazing of windscreens on land vehicles is the focus of a revised standard. The revision aims to promote confidence within the auto glazing industry and by doing so, increase the trust of consumers in the sector.

“With 19.5 million registered vehicles in Australia as of this year [1], the reach of this revised standard cannot be understated,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement at Standards Australia, Daniel Chidgey. “The revision aims to promote awareness across the industry of the agreed requirements around windscreens, which in turn will hopefully continue to build the confidence of road users.”

This revision of AS 2080:2019 specifies methods of testing for windscreens and other glazing for power-driven land vehicles. Changes aim to establish testing requirements, throughout the design and manufacturing processes, that will help ensure the integrity of the material.

“The changes aim to increase public confidence in the Australian auto glass replacement industry,” said Rick Janssen Chair of the Standards Australia ME-055 Technical Committee that reviewed the standard. “It will assist both in providing clarity to auto glaziers around meeting the standard requirements and establishing a common language in defining quality and safety criteria.”

The standard suggests material used is adequately resistant to incidents that may occur in normal driving conditions, and to atmospheric and temperature conditions, chemical action, combustion and abrasion.

“Using consistent language to build confidence in the auto-glazing industry is an important outcome. From manufacturers to the general public, this revision aims to assist in increasing certainty across the board. With significant support from the industry this a project we are incredibly proud to have helped deliver,” concluded Mr. Chidgey.

[1] https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mediareleasesbytitle/28861A19CCDB9441CA25753D001B59DA?OpenDocument

CONTACT

Meg Cole-Adams Public Affairs Officer 02 9237 6071

New International Standards to increase driver safety

01 November 2018

Read more

2019-09-02
Location: Australia
Description:

Highlighting safety standards to celebrate Electrical Safety Week 2019

02 September 2019

Electrical safety week for 2019 kicks off today serving as a timely reminder that safety around electricity is a 24/7 exercise. Given the complexity of the challenge, there is plenty of guidance out there for the community, professionals in the space, and students and apprentices learning the ropes.

“Among the huge amounts of safety guidance on all things electricity we find Australian and international standards across many different areas of the electrical sector,” said General Manager of Strategy and Engagement, Adam Stingemore. “While much of this guidance is aimed at the professionals in the sector, the consumers are ultimately the big winners with a lot of the guidance aimed at ensuring we can all use electricity safely.”

Some of the standards being acknowledged this week include:

  • AS/NZS 3112:2017 Approval and test specification – plugs and socket-outlets
  • AS 3000:2018 Electrical installations
  • AS/NZS 6215:2008 Electric toys – Safety
  • AS/NZS 1154.1-2009 Insulator and conductor fittings for overhead power lines, Part 1: Performance, material, general requirements and dimensions
  • AS/NZS 3808:2000 Rec:2017 Insulating and sheathing materials for electric cables


“This list is a very small sample proving the impact standards have in improving electrical safety,” said Mr Stingemore. “Standards we are recognising this week highlight the broad nature of the safety we help provide covering consumers and professionals in a variety of settings.”

“Regardless of their focus, standards have been keeping electricians and the Australian public safe for just under 100 years and we are pleased to say this shows no signs of slowing down,” concluded Mr Stingemore

CONTACT

Meg Cole-Adams Public Affairs Officer  02 9237 0671

Battery storage standard heads to ballot with strong support.

08 July 2019

Read more

Standards Australia partners with Techstreet to deliver greater access and choice for users of Australian Standards®

31 May 2019

Read more

 

2019-08-19
Location: Australia
Description:

Changing Australia with industry 4.0

Standards Australia, industry, academia, and technical experts meet to shape Australia’s Industry 4.0 future

International standards are to be identified in priority areas to make Australia a leader in Industry 4.0

Standards Australia outlined how developing standards can help Australia tackle the next major industrial revolution at the recent Industry 4.0 Advanced Manufacturing Forum (I4AMF),

Standards Australia presented at the conference about how Australian businesses can optimise their supply chain processes, reduce risks, eliminate inefficiencies, and improve productivity.
 
“The Fourth Industrial Revolution, or Industry 4.0, is changing industries around the globe with a move towards seamless integration of physical and digital systems. Every year we are adopting new technologies like 3D printing, blockchain as well as IoT and edge computing – standards play a huge role in outlining how they operate in our current industrial landscape.” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey.

Around the world there are standards being developed that assist with the adoption of industry 4.0 on a global scale such as the ISO Joint Technical Committee 1, Working Group 12 – which is currently exploring 3D printing and scanning for adoption in the med-tech and construction industries.
 
Standards Australia can work alongside industry and government to identify Australia’s opportunities for adoption of new technologies.
 
“By leading this conversation, we look forward to shaping the way Australia responds to new technologies and by working with industry experts we can navigate this emerging industrial era.”
 
Standards Australia have identified opportunities to assist small to medium sized manufacturers transition to modernise, grow and employ digital capabilities which will be pursued in the months ahead.

Standards Australia partners with Techstreet to deliver greater access and choice for users of Australian Standards®

Read more

Drug testing methods get a revision to increase safety

Read more

Contact Name: Scott McGrath
Phone: +612 9237 6044
Address: 20 Bridge Street
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
URL: https://www.standards.org.au
Comments: GPO Box 476 Sydney NSW 2001 tel:+61 2 9237 6000
2019-08-16
Location: Australia
Description:

Relevant standards key to improved workplace safety

In October 2018, Standards Australia adopted the new ISO Occupational health and safety management systems – Requirements with guidance for use, standard as AS/NZS ISO 45001:2018

“AS/NZS ISO 45001 has given health and safety professionals in organisations of any size a new way to help manage the many safety risks in workplaces across the country,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey.

“While AS/NZS ISO 45001 has now been published, this means that AS/NZS 4801:2001, Occupational health and safety management systems - Specification with guidance for use is now available superseded.”

The Technical Committee of Standards Australia responsible for these standards, SF-001 Occupational Health & Safety Management, has met many times to discuss 4801 and 45001 and how the two interact with legislation across the country.

Today, AS/NZS 4801:2001 remains a current Australian Standard cited in legislation across Australia. It is important to note, it is up to government authorities to decide whether available superseded standards should be referenced in legislation.

“After much consideration, the decision from the technical committee was made for the standard to be available superseded. However, AS/NZS ISO 45001:2018 is the most current Standard for Safety Management Systems, and should be considered by organisations wishing to maintain a contemporary Safety Management System,” said SF-001 Committee Member, David Solomon.

“The objective of this standard is to reduce workplace injuries and fatalities which is exactly why Standards Australia has been working with industry, government and the general public to ensure the current standard available to Australian organisations contains the most relevant and up to date information available,” said Mr Chidgey

Contact Name: Scott McGrath
Phone: +612 9237 6044
Address: 20 Bridge Street
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
URL: https://www.standards.org.au
Comments: GPO Box 476 Sydney NSW 2001 tel:+61 2 9237 6000
2019-07-29
Location: Australia
Description:

Executive report

Standards Australia and Techstreet launch new webstore

Technical Governance Review – one year on

Battery storage standard heads to ballot with strong support

Improving reach, access, and relevance of Australian Standards

Human resource experts to help raise Australian standards

Standards Australia – coming to a capital city near you!

Public comment pilot closing soon

Help us review the safety around lifejackets

In Conversation with David Solomon

International update

Sector update

Drafts open for comment

Joint forestry standard

 

Selected Report Sections for Power Electronics Interest

 Just over 12 months ago, Standards Australia embarked upon our most significant change to date – the Technical Governance Review (TGR). This project was about putting the thousands of contributors front and centre in all aspects of our digital transformation and business improvement agenda.

With the support of cameron.ralph.khoury, and dozens of submissions and workshops with stakeholders right around Australia, we developed an implementation plan to become more strategic, open and proactive.

We’ve learnt a great deal in our first year.

From the success of our monthly project proposal rounds, to the learnings from piloting a new public comment platform, to surveys for the performance evaluation of Standards Australia, and the development of an entirely new contributor portal, there are some great runs on the board already.

As with any long term transformation, we’ve also learnt that not everything will be delivered first time and on time, nor every proposed change will be embraced by our stakeholders.  On a number of fronts, the learnings that have come from initial projects will continue to inform our work program as we move on.

We have a further update below which covers the breadth of the work of the Standards Australia team and those working with us to deliver on these initiatives.

As we’ve been talking to our stakeholders on this in committee meetings and other forums, the clear message to us is use the momentum and keep going.

—Adrian O’Connell, Acting Chief Executive Officer

Standards Australia and Techstreet launch new webstore

Standards Australia recently announced a new distribution agreement with Techstreet (a Clarivate Analytics company) aimed at improving access to Australian standards.

As part of this agreement, Standards Australia and Techstreet have launched a new webstore operated by Techstreet accessible via http://store.standards.org.au. Available now, this platform is designed to enrich the experience for users of standards and other technical documents.

Read more in our media release.

Technical Governance Review – one year on

In 2017, Standards Australia’s Board committed to a thorough program of review of our Technical, Company and Accreditation governance arrangements.

The Technical Governance Review (TGR) led by independent consultants cameron.ralph.khoury was undertaken through 2017 and 2018. A final report (PDF) was released in April 2018 by cameron.ralph.khoury, and Standards Australia released its response (PDF) shortly after.

A number of priorities were addressed in the response, with a clear focus on the six main steps of the standards development process, supported by a three-tiered reform approach. Standards Australia has outlined changes to be implemented as part of this review in the Implementation Plan FY2019 (PDF).

The plan highlighted a number of deliverables throughout the four quarters of FY 2018-2019.

Highlights of initiatives delivered in the past 12 months are:

Release of the first phase of the new contributor platform “Connect”

The pilot for a new online Public Comment platform

Monthly projects proposal process

Kick-off workshops across all projects

Mid-project surveys across all projects to identify and ascertain any early issues and provide feedback on Standards Australia’s performance

Policy review on appointment, tenure and performance of Committee Chairs

Independent facilitators and technical writers in place to provide assistance on complex technical committees. A framework and criteria on how to apply these resources has beendeveloped and rolled out with resources in place supporting committees in need.

Incubator Projects including “red flags” and balloting by stage

Other committed initiatives are underway and will be delivered within this calendar year:

Training for Committee Chairs and Nominating Organisations

Development of framework to better resolve disputes

Process for parallel adoptions of international standards to be rolled out

Throughout the program, we committed to update our stakeholders on progress of the work – view our quarter 4 report.

Chair Policy

The TGR identified the role of Committee Chair as an important variable for committee effectiveness and feedback received from stakeholders highlighted that the performance of current Committee Chairs is inconsistent and does not always align with current expectations.

The cameron.ralph.khoury report suggested a number of initiatives relating to improving the performance of Committee Chairs. In our Implementation Plan, Standards Australia has committed, in addition to training for Committee Chairs to be provided both electronically and in person, to review the Policy on appointment, tenure and performance of Committee Chairs. The review of the policy and its approval was finalised in June 2019 and Standards Australia will now progress to Stage 2 of the initiative, by implementing the new policy via a staggered approach ensuring an orderly transition.

Key aspects of the new policy are:

Formalising appointment and management of tenure (tenure will be formally 3 years with Standards Australia’s Production Management Group (PMG) approval needed for renewal);

Establishing the concept of Chair-elect to ensure appropriate succession planning;

Implementing a mechanism for ongoing monitoring of Committee Chairs’ performance by Standards Australia’s PMG.

Further information on next steps will be communicated to current Committee Chairs and members.

TGR - Looking forward (FY20)

As part of our Action Plan (2019-20), Standards Australia launched our TGR Implementation Plan FY2020 (PDF) at our Council Meeting in May 2019. The implementation plan continues to deliver against key recommendations from the TGR and we are once again committed to informing our stakeholders on the progress of the work on an ongoing basis.

Battery storage standard heads to ballot with strong support

In recognition of the need for an installation standard for battery storage devices in Australia, Standards Australia has been working with industry, government and the broader community.

The draft standard has gone through the consensus-based standards development process, with Standards Australia engaging with representatives on the relevant technical committee throughout this process to ensure a wide-range of views have been considered.

Read more in our media release.

Improving reach, access, and relevance of Australian Standards

Standards Australia has been working towards opening up access to our content with the needs of stakeholders and users front of mind. This process has included comprehensive consultation in each capital city across Australia seeking views on our Distribution and Licensing Policy Discussion Paper.

Heading to each capital city has allowed us to hear first hand the views of industry, community groups, business, governments, students, and apprentices and to hear firsthand what has worked well and what can improve in the future.

This is an exciting step towards delivering greater value and improving access to Australian Standards, which is to be taken following careful consideration ensuring Standards Australia’s long term sustainability and the ability to increase the reach and relevance of its content across Australia.

In coming months, the submissions received and comments gathered at consultations will be collated and considered as future distribution processes are finalised by Standards Australia.

Standards Australia – coming to a capital city near you!

Join Standards Australia’s Chairman, Richard Brooks, and members of Standards Australia’s leadership team to discuss and get feedback on our plans to engage stakeholders and deliver standards in a smarter and more efficient way.

Key topics include:

Improving how we develop standards and the contributor experience

Our plans to shape the future of our organisation

An update on our Technical Governance Review

For more details and to register, please click on the links below:

Perth, 1 August 2019

Brisbane, 28 August 2019

Melbourne, 3 September 2019

Sydney, 15 October 2019

Canberra, 17 October 2019

Public comment pilot closing soon

In a continuous effort to make it easier to engage with Standards Australia, we opened a pilot of our new Public Comment system. With a few weeks left before the pilot ends, we encourage you to give it a try and share your feedback with us via comment@standards.org.au or this quick survey. We are also excited to show the system in action through a short video.

In Conversation with David Solomon

With safety front of mind, David has been involved in standards development for around five years. Representing industry, and as a certified Management System Specialist, David has contributed to one of the larger projects published by Standards Australia – AS/NZS ISO 45001:2018, Occupational health and safety management systems – Requirements with guidance for use. This was a major international standard, adopted into the Australian system after careful consideration of its impact and is now at work in organisations of varying sizes across the country.

Standards Australia: How long have you been involved in standards development?

David Solomon: I first joined up in October 2014, and given my background I have found it an excellent way to support industries across Australia.

SA: In your area of work, what has been the biggest success?

DS: Without a doubt, the development and publication of ISO 45001. Notwithstanding we had some issues to work through prior to adoption, I think the best aspect of this standard was the way it integrates with other management system standards. While there some concerns about how it would interact with its predecessor, AS/NZS 4801, there was little doubt it would interact well with other management system standards such as ISO 9001 and ISO 14001, which assists in streamlining documentation for everyone.

SA: Do you think the broader community understands the role of standards?

DS: I think there is good general understanding, and the Australian public certainly has a level of trust in the work of standards and the content development. There are broader challenges in terms of their uptake given a number of barriers including price, access and the static PDFs which have been the status quo for many years. With the changes happening at Standards Australia, I am hopeful these barriers will be identified and resolved where possible ultimately leading to great access to standards in every sector of the economy.

SA: What does the future of standardisation look like?

DS: Very healthy. There are several programs in place to mentor and educate younger generations on the design and development of standards. Similarly, existing standards experts remain engaged from the broad cross-section of Standards Australia committees I sit on maintaining knowledge about them. And most importantly, it would appear there is a healthy appetite for them from industry.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from July (PDF):

Trade-restrictive measures continue at historically high level

New ISO standard for urban resilience in development

Robots, AI and big data pave way for smart farming

Sector update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

Joint forestry standard

The first meeting of the AS/NZS 4708 Sustainable Forest Management Standards Reference Committee on the Gold Coast recently set an ambitious target to develop a joint Australia-New Zealand Sustainable Forest Management Standard (AS 4708).

The joint standard will provide common benchmarks for certified Australian and New Zealand forests.

The new standard must meet PEFC social, economic and environmental benchmarks. The committee is now crafting working proposals ahead of the next meeting in August.

www.standards.org.au

 

 

2019-07-24
Location: Australia
Description:

Australia takes another step towards an on-site battery storage standard

Standards Australia has been working with government and industry on a new standard for on-site battery storage.

The committee ballot closed on 22 July 2019 and despite negative ballots being submitted, the ballot has reached consensus in Australia in accordance with Standards Australia's rules.

A process has commenced to consider the negative votes from a small number of Australian stakeholders, however, it is anticipated this will not significantly delay publication. Discussions have also commenced with Standards New Zealand regarding publication.

Standards Australia thanks industry and government stakeholders for their continuing support.

Contact

Scott McGrath

Government Relations Manager

+612 9237 6044

2019-07-08
Location: Newsletter
Description:

Battery storage standard heads to ballot with strong support.

In recognition of the need for an installation standard for battery storage devices in Australia, Standards Australia has been working with industry, government and the broader community.

The draft standard has gone through the consensus-based standards development process, with Standards Australia engaging with representatives on the relevant technical committee throughout this process to ensure a wide-range of views have been considered.

The draft standard, Electrical Installations - Safety of battery systems for use with power conversion equipment, is progressing to the ballot stage of the standards development process.

“Given strong support from a range of key industry and government representatives, this standard should be heading towards publication in coming weeks,” said General Manager, Strategy and Engagement, Adam Stingemore.

“This draft standard has been updated in an effort to make it easier for the installer to know what requirements are necessary for the type of system they are installing,” said Mr Sandy Atkins, from Standards Australia’s EL-042 Technical Committee responsible for the standard.

Standards Australia expects that work in this area will continue as the industry evolves. Proposals for new standards or changes to standards can be submitted at any time.

“Standards are detailed, technical documents which address safety and efficiency challenges in heavily regulated sectors. The publication of standards such as this prove the value of the Standards Australia process in bringing industry, government and the community together for a collective benefit. We look forward to progressing through the ballot stage of development over the coming weeks,” concluded Mr Stingemore.

Standards Australia partners with Techstreet to deliver greater access and choice for users of Australian Standards®

31 May 2019

Standards Australia has entered into a new distribution agreement with Techstreet, a Clarivate Analytics company, to deliver greater access to content supporting innovation, safety and compliance in industries and communities across Australia.

Under the new agreement, Techstreet will become an additional distributor of Standards

Australia’s content, including Australian Standards® and other technical documents such as ISO and IEC materials.

Users will soon be able to access Standards Australia content through a new webstore and through a subscription service to Techstreet Enterprise, Techstreet’s standards management platform.

Techstreet Enterprise provides easy, immediate access to one of the world's largest collections of industry codes and standards, plus web-based workflow tools to help standards users manage mission-critical information and make better decisions faster.

Richard Brooks, Standards Australia’s Chairman, said the organisation explored a number of Australian and global publishers and distributors before appointing Clarivate’s Techstreet as a new partner.

“Clarivate is a market leader in this space, with extensive experience in the distribution of technical content. We are excited about bringing choice to how customers access standards in Australia,” Mr Brooks said.

“This is an exciting step in improving access to Australian Standards®, while allowing our organisation to build internal capability and develop external partnerships to deliver new methods of distribution.”

“Ultimately, improving how we distribute our content ensures we serve our public purpose – to help industries work safely, sustainably and more effectively.”

Todd Fegan, Vice President of Techstreet, said the company is extremely excited to expand its efforts to deliver more options and easier access to users of Standards Australia’s content.

“We’re pleased to become a distributor of Standards Australia’s content and deliver better solutions together to help support Australian innovation and compliance,” Mr Fegan said.

“For many years, Techstreet has been a trusted provider of industry codes and standards. We will continue our commitment to enhance our online library of engineering standards and related documents to create ongoing value for our customers.”

Specific details of the changes as a result of this announcement will be outlined in coming weeks, including how to access the new webstore. In the meantime, Sales enquiries for subscription customers should be directed to Andrew O’Brien, Head of Sales, Australia.

Clarivate Analytics plc (NYSE: CCC; CCC.WS) is the parent company to several established brands in Australia supporting a range of scientific and technical publishing markets and houses one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive collections of industry codes and standards. Its brand portfolio includes Web of Science, Techstreet, Derwent, Compumark, Cortellis and MarkMonitor.

To view a full version of the release, http://standards.org.au/news

Archived Events: (Click to expand/collapse)
2019-06-16
Location: Newsletter
Description:

Help shape the future Standards Australia

A once in a generation opportunity has presented itself to Australian industry, consumers, businesses, and the broader community with Standards Australia seeking input on how it distributes content.

Following an important arbitration win supporting Standards Australia’s position that future distribution of its content will not be on an exclusive basis, Standards Australia has been working towards opening up access to its content with the needs of our stakeholders and users front of mind.

“As an organization, we have been working to make Australian communities safer, help our economy grow and connect our nation to the world for close to 100 years. This decision late last year has enabled us to take even more steps towards opening up access to our content,” said Adam Stingemore, General Manager Strategy and Engagement.

This process will include comprehensive consultation in each capital city across Australia seeking views on our Distribution and Licensing Policy Discussion Paper, which has been released today.

“Heading to each capital city in coming weeks will enable us to canvass the views of industry, community groups, business, governments, students, and apprentices and to hear firsthand what has worked well and what can improve in the future,” said Mr Stingemore.

“This is an exciting step towards delivering greater value and improving access to Australian Standards, to be taken following careful consideration ensuring Standards Australia’s long term sustainability and the ability to increase the reach and relevance of our content across Australia.”

Interested parties are encouraged to read the discussion paper here. Submissions can be made until 29 July 2019, with registration for the consultations available here.

Contact Scott McGrath

Public affairs Officer

+612 9237 6044

Standards Australia partners with Techstreet to deliver greater access and choice for users of Australian Standards®

31 May 2019

 

Read more

Drug testing methods get a revision to increase safety

22 May 2019

Read more

https://www.standards.org.au/news

2019-05-30
Location: Newsletter
Description:

Techstreet appointed as additional distributor of content
Drug testing methods get a revision to increase safety
In conversation with Dr. Jan Herrmann
Workshop: How to write an Australian Standard
Refreshed public comment platform
Commissioning fee for AS/NZS IDTs waived – pilot extended
Draft rules for dispute avoidance and conflict resolution open for public consultation
International update
Sector update
Drafts open for comment
PEFC standards open for public comment
Public consultation has commenced on AS 5301

Techstreet appointed as additional distributor of content

Standards Australia has entered into a new distribution arrangement with Techstreet, a Clarivate Analytics company, to deliver greater access to content supporting innovation, safety and compliance in industries and communities across Australia.

This new agreement means Techstreet will securely distribute Standard Australia’s content through a new webstore (soon to be available via the Standards Australia website) and the Techstreet Enterprise website for subscriptions.

Clarivate has served the standards community for more than 22 years, with more than 150 organisations responsible for publishing standards delivering content through its secure, easy-to-use platforms.

Read more in our media release.

Australian and International Standards continue to be available through SAI Global, in addition to Techstreet.

Standards Australia remains committed to an open and genuine process.

This exciting first phase move for us comes right before the commencement of our consultation on broader distribution policy that will commence in June 2019.

Commissioning fee for AS/NZS IDTs waived – pilot extended

For the past year, Standards Australia and Standards New Zealand have been trialling a pilot where the commissioning fees for joint standards development projects for the Identical (IDT) Adoption of ISO and IEC Standards have been waived.

Due to the benefits realised and the positive feedback received from stakeholders during this pilot, Standards Australia and Standards New Zealand have agreed to extend this pilot for a further 12 months.

The pilot will be reassessed in May 2020.

Read more in our statement.

Drafts Open for Public Comment

Download Draft

AS/NZS 61386.1:2015 Amd 1 Conduit system for cable management, Part 1: General requirements

el-004 Electrical Accessories

03-06-2019

Make a comment

 

Download Draft

AS/NZS 62560:2017 Amd 1 Self-ballasted LED-lamps for general lighting services by voltage > 50 V - Safety specifications

el-041 Lamps and Related Equipment

10-07-2019

Make a comment

2019-05-21
Location: Newsletter
Description:

Latest News

Drug testing methods get a revision to increase safety

22 May 2019

Key points:

  • A revised standard for drug testing in saliva has been published to improve the reliability of results, confidence in the testing and ultimately improved safety
  • The standard has been developed in partnership with a wide range of industry professionals including aviation and union representatives

Safety and reliability has taken front seat in a revised standard guiding the detection of drugs in oral fluids, aimed at improving onsite drug testing across several sectors of the economy.

Mobile drug testing is increasingly more common, with police conducting up to 200,000 roadside drug tests each year in NSW by the year 2020[1]. However, drug testing is also becoming more common and widespread in a range of industries such as mining, construction and transport. Standards Australia has been working with industry bodies and community members to update the standard for drug testing to ensure methods are up-to-date and deliver results consistent with community expectations.

“A number of occupations are involved in regular drug testing as part of achieving a safer workplace. Given the nature of the work at the centre of these tests, there is a strong interest in accurate results,” said Mr Adrian O’Connell, Acting CEO of Standards Australia.

AS/NZS 4670:2019, Procedure for specimen collection and the detection and quantitation of drugs in oral fluid, has been published with a clear commitment of results and safety. The standard highlights the latest methods of detecting drugs in saliva, which is particularly useful for law enforcement agencies as well as groups conducting local drug testing at major events like music festivals.

“This has been a very important area of work for us for some time. This revision has been built with regard to the latest technology and scientific developments to benefit to our community,” said Mr O’Connell.

“The publication of this standard will have incredible flow on effects, as it guides safety improvements across countless industries in communities across the country.”

Organisations performing onsite drug testing stand to benefit most, given the improvements provided by this standard for the detection of drugs using oral fluids, according to Dr Michael Robertson, Chair of the Standards Australia Technical Committee responsible for the revised standard.

“Procedures outlined in this standard have been developed with the support of device manufacturers, testing laboratories, aviation agencies, trade unions, and several other groups with varied interests and requirements,” Dr Robertson said.

“All of these groups have worked tirelessly together to ensure the standard is easy to use yet comprehensive, while achieving the primary aim of improving safety in the workplace and on our roads, rail and in the air.”

 

[1] https://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/stayingsafe/alcoholdrugs/drugdriving/index.html

 

Contact

Error! Hyperlink reference not valid.

Public Affairs Officer

Related News

A wealth of knowledge shapes revised standards

17 April 2019

Read more

 

Balance for Better at Standards Australia

08 March 2019

Read more

https://www.standards.org.au/news

 

 

 

2019-04-30
Location: Newsletter
Description:

The electrotechnology and energy sector comprises of the physical generation and energy transmission infrastructure, the components and devices, and the installations and appliances on the electricity network. Also included in the sector is gas transportation, gas distribution, gas appliances and alternative energy sources.

Safety is the main driver of standards development for the sector, however, other standards activities focus on clean energy, reliability of supply, and performance. Standards play a vital role in streamlining processes and improving efficiency, assisting with the overall profitability and export competitiveness for Australian companies.

Standards Australia is actively engaged with the sector and is committed to developing contemporary Australian and International standards that deliver a high level of safety, performance and environmental protection to the sector.

Across the energy supply chain, there is a shift toward smarter and interconnected products and services. As infrastructure becomes increasingly reliant on technology, there is a greater need to heighten security measures and standards, in order to protect critical energy infrastructure.

Current key projects include:

  • Revision of AS/NZS 3000:2007, Electrical installations (the Wiring Rules)
  • Development of AS/NZS 5139, Electrical installations—Safety of battery systems for use with power conversion equipment

Greater choice of global standards to benefit Australia

01 March 2019

Statement

A broader range of standards for use in the Australian market has been opened up following the signing of an agreement between Standards Australia and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Standards Australia already has a strong, well-established presence at the International Organisation of Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and with other standards development organisations. This new agreement will add to the existing standards from which Australian stakeholders can draw in new and traditional areas of technology.

The IEEE develops standards in batteries, consumer electronics, nanotechnology, transportation, smart grids, nuclear power, software systems, as well as healthcare IT and computer technology. All of which are now more readily available to the Australian community as a result of this agreement.

“An agreement of this nature has incredible potential to open up international opportunities for Australian organisations,” said Mr Adrian O’Connell, General Manager - International at Standards Australia. “This type of agreement is perfectly timed given the transformative technologies we are seeing in nearly every sector of the global economy.”

Other News

In this Edition:

Executive report
Talking hydrogen
Register now for graphene forum
A wealth of knowledge shapes revised standards
Calling all emerging industry experts
In conversation with Dr. Tobias Feakin
Technical governance review – 3rd quarter update
Returning to Nepal
International update
Sector update
Drafts open for comment
Timelines drawn for new Responsible Wood standard

Executive report

Another busy month is just behind us, with exciting work going on across all sectors and with international colleagues.

Early in April, we welcomed delegates from Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu, all for the common purpose of strengthening cyber security in the Pacific region.

Partnering with The Cyber Cooperation Program, our International Team hosted The Cyber Security Regional Standardisation Enhancement Program.

Focussing on the adoption and use of standards from the ISO/IEC 27000 series within the Pacific region, the two day forum included workshops with each of the Pacific countries as well as listening to an array of key speakers in the cyber security sector.

The forum was a great opportunity to listen to industry experts that shared practical and sustainable approaches to good cyber security. We want to ensure the Pacific region continues to thrive economically, is able to protect their industry, their government, their community and citizens from ever increasing cyber security threats.

We have just provided a further update on our Technical Governance Review. This last quarter was centred on the access of information to our contributors, and the building of knowledge for all those involved with standards, as well as refreshing and updating our learning platform to give more focused support in key areas.

We have a very strong pipeline of projects coming to the end and look forward to publishing a number of key standards in the next couple of months.

As a final point from me, we have just opened our next round of applications for our NEXTgen program. NEXTgen is a big part of the future of standards in Australia and we are calling for nominations now.

As always, a big thanks to our contributors for your ongoing work.


—Adrian O’Connell, Acting Chief Executive Officer

Technical governance review – 3rd quarter update

Through careful implementation of a series of changes across our processes, Standards Australia is working to make the standards system in Australia even better through efficiency and effectiveness.

Access to information
The first three months of 2019 have seen the release of the first phase of Connect, our new contributor platform, and the completion of a pilot for a new online Public Comment platform. As well as delivering some new functionality straight away, both represent ongoing work to provide much better access to information about the standards development work program. Feedback on both platforms has been incredibly positive with a strong development pipeline for Connect being worked on now.

The next stages of both programs of work, will see even greater functionality and deliver on our commitment to make our contributors’ engagement with Standards Australia much simpler, faster and better.

Building knowledge
The Technical Governance Review recognised the pivotal roles played by committee chairs and by Nominating Organisations within the standards development process. By providing better support in these areas, we expect long-term benefits to the entire standards development system.

The Standards Academy, our learning platform for contributors and staff, was relaunched in early March 2019. The Academy has a new look and feel giving contributors easier access to high quality online learning material, and options to register for face to face workshops.

The range of learning materials is being expanded to give more focused support in key areas, such as knowledge and skills needed to be an effective committee chair, as well as enhancing the capabilities of those already in the role.

The team is also developing material to assist Nominating Organisations. Those who are new to standards development need to build their knowledge of our processes, along with guidance on how to contribute effectively. Organisations involved in multiple committees may want ideas to coordinate the contribution of their committee representatives over a number of committees and projects.

For information on the progress of other projects under our Technical Governance Review (TGR) Implementation Plan for FY2019 (PDF), go to the Quarter 3 Progress Report on our website.

International

Standards Australia represents our nation on the two major international standardising bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)* and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

We co-ordinate the attendance of Australian experts at international meetings and participate in the preparation of a wide range of International Standards. We are extremely active within the international standardisation movement and a number of our senior management team members hold important voluntary offices on international standards bodies.

Find out more

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from April (PDF):

  • Standards build trust: CEN and CENELEC launch a declaration for the European elections
  • Standards cooperation is key to making AI and smart cities a reality
  • Call for experts in future sustainable transportation

Sector update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

2019-03-27
Location: Newsletter
Description:

Executive Report
Getting Smart with Our Cities
First Contact for Australian Health Call Centres
Discussion Paper on Aluminium Composite Panel Product Labelling
In Conversation with Frank Schrever
Working at Standards Australia
Balance for Better at Standards Australia
International Update
Sector Update
Drafts Open for Comment
Telecommunications Cabling Standards Get a Makeover

Executive Report

At the time of writing we are coming to the end of another busy month for Standards Australia.

From new standards to help consumers engage with health contact centres, to the establishment of a Smart Cities Advisory Group to bring infrastructure and data together through standards, our work sits at the centre of much of so much of what we are driving forward in Australia today.

The single common theme across all these agendas is that together, industries, governments and other communities can achieve much more by working together with shared objectives and common goals. As we look ahead at the work we have in the pipeline, we have much more to deliver this year.

We were also able to say thank you and goodbye to Dr Bronwyn Evans this month, as Bronwyn finished her term as Chief Executive Officer. Having worked with Bronwyn for more than 5 years, I can attest to her deep commitment and passion for the work that we all do, and we wish her every success for the future.

As our Board works towards the appointment of the next CEO, I look forward to supporting Standards Australia and ensuring that we continue to make Australian life better.
—Adrian O’Connell, Acting Chief Executive Officer

Getting Smart with Our Cities

As our cities get smarter, the need for the adoption and development of technology standards for smart cities grow.

In support of the growing smart cities agenda right across Australia, a discussion regarding the necessity for a Smart Cities Advisory Group was recently facilitated by Standards Australia.

The session was hosted by Dr. Ian Oppermann, CEO and Chief Data Scientist of the NSW Data Analytics Centre, who also chairs the Australian ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee.

The session was very successful in identifying that there is a space for a Smart Cities Standards Reference Group. Other prospects were also noted including the development of a national approach for smart cities and understanding what this means for consumers and citizens alike.

This roundtable is part of Standards Australia’s active participation in national and international discussions. We remain committed to partnering with stakeholders to ensure the currency and accuracy of our suite of standards for smart cities.

The inaugural meeting of the Smart Cities Standards Reference Group will take place on 1 May 2019 to help develop the smart cities strategic roadmap for Australia. To be involved with this discussion, please register your interest at SEM@standards.org.au

First Contact for Australian Health Call Centres

As rapid growth of digital capability and accessibility continue, health contact centres have been taking strides to provide additional means for Australians to access quality health care and health information through the numerous telehealth services available.

Find out more on our website.

Discussion Paper on Aluminium Composite Panel Product Labelling

Aluminium Composite Panels (ACP) have been at the centre of a number of investigations in Australia and around the world. The development a permanent labelling system for ACP has been identified as a necessity. Standards Australia is seeking advice from industry and other stakeholders on the proposed approach for labelling of Aluminium Composite Panels.

View the Labelling of ACP products discussion paper (PDF).

In Conversation with Frank Schrever

Frank Schrever is the Chairman of SF-041, Safety of Machinery, the technical committee of Standards Australia responsible for all of the AS 4024 series which includes other technical and machine specific standards.

Frank joined SF-041 in 1999, initially as the representative for the Institute of Instrumentation, Control and Automation (IICA), latterly Australian Manufacturing Technology Institute Ltd (AMTIL) and has been chair of the committee since 2011.

Frank has over 40 years’ experience in instrumentation and automation markets. Along with his committee commitments, Frank has managed a number of subsidiaries of multinational companies, and in 2010, Frank established his own consultancy providing machine safety training, risk assessment and validation services.

Standards Australia: How do standards impact your professional career?
Frank Schrever: Machine safety standards have had a huge impact on not only my career, but also on the entire automation industry. Since 1996, when the first edition of AS 4024, Safety of Machinery, was published, there has been a revolution in the design of machinery safety control systems because of the global underpinnings of this standard. All sectors of the industry have been impacted, whether they be designers, manufacturers, importers, suppliers, system integrators, industrial electricians, safety professionals or machine operators. The law has long asked for removal of machine risks by design, and this standard was the first, and remains the only, comprehensive guide as to how to do this.

SA: Do you think the robotics industry is still growing?
FS: The robotics industry is growing very rapidly, and with many parallel streams. There are the traditional industrial robotic arms, which now can have collaborative applications, allowing humans to safely work beside them in carefully designed situations. There are service robots and personal care robots which are exploding in the range of applications. Autonomous robots, such as farming robots, are rapidly evolving, to the point where a single human may soon have swarms of these machines assisting in the management of large acreages.

SA: Will standards expand the sector in Australia?
FS: We have recently hosted an international meeting of ISO/TC 299, Industrial Robots, at the University of Melbourne. Australia is very involved in the development of the latest robot standards. This will assist the many groups that are involved in robot development in Australia, to be at the leading edge of global standards compliance.

SA: What are some of the lesser known uses of robotics?
FS: Perhaps some of the lesser known applications are in the areas of limb replacement where a person can receive a tailor-made replacement body part which will respond to signals from the brain to accurately control the robotic assembly. This will revolutionise how we deal with these medical issues and restore (possibly even enhance) motor functions to people whose conditions previously could not be addressed.

SA: What do you think the future of standardisation looks like?
FS: The future of standardisation in the area that I am involved in, will increasingly involve software and probably image analysis. The holy grail of machine safety is having the machine ‘see’ the environment around it, interpret this correctly in all conditions, and behave according to this analysis, i.e. stop when it sees imminent danger to a human. We are still a fair way from this result, but without careful, global standardisation, we will not achieve it.

Working at Standards Australia

In late 2018, the HR and Learning and Development Team conducted an employee engagement survey, with incredibly positive results returned.

“What do you like most about working at Standards Australia?” received the unanimous response of “the people”.

If you are interested in joining our incredibly diverse, dynamic and committed team, jump onto our website and browse the opportunities.

Balance for Better at Standards Australia

This year’s campaign for International Women’s Day was ‘Balance for Better' reflecting on gender balance and closing the gender gap in different aspects of the community, from the boardroom to sports coverage.

Find out more on our website.

International Update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from March (PDF):

  • Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA) signed
  • Looking for health advances? Latest ISOfocus examines healthcare hot topics
  • New international standard will offer risk management framework for AI

Sector Update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page

Drafts Open for Comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

SDO News

Telecommunications Cabling Standards Get a Makeover

Communications Alliance, as the Standards Development Organisation (SDO) for the telecommunications industry, has recently released draft AS/CA S008 and draft AS/CA S009 for consultation.

AS/CA S008, Requirements for customer cabling products, specifies the requirements for cable and cabling products intended to be connected to telecommunications networks from within customer premises. AS/CA S009, Installation requirements for customer cabling (Wiring rules), complements the product standard by specifying the necessary installation and maintenance requirements. These two standards are called up under legislation and are enforced by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

The scheduled review of the current editions of the two standards identified several areas that required revision to cater for technology changes and the significant growth of connected devices in customer premises. In its 18-months revision, the Committee drew upon the most currently available industry information. The revised standards now align with new Australian safety standards and include new requirements for cabling supporting hazardous voltages and consider the growing application of customer cabling for the delivery of power to remote devices.

The two draft standards, together with an accompanying background paper, can be obtained from Communications Alliance.

Public comment closes at 5.00 pm (AEST) on Friday, 24 May 2019.

 

 

2019-03-08
Location: Newsletter
Description:

You can recieve general news but most of it is not electronic standards.

www.standards.org.au/news

 

 

 

2019-03-04
Location: Australia
Description:

CEO report

This has been a very busy, exciting month not just for us at Standards Australia but for every one of our contributors.
 
We are pleased to have launched Connect, our new contributor platform which has been months, if not years in the making.
 
Connect will eventually replace The Hub, which has been our contributor platform for many years. It has been built with contributors, for contributors and we are incredibly proud to be able to start with this first stage release as part of our overall objective to make it easier for our contributors to work with us.
 
As with many technology projects, we had a hiccup along the way when the platform didn’t behave as we had expected when we moved from our test to live environment. This was far from ideal, particularly given we lost access to The Hub for a short time.
 
On the upside, the team pulled together and worked tirelessly until the issues were resolved and we were able to go live on a second attempt. Feedback so far has been great. Thank you all for your comments. 
 
We look forward to continuing to build on this platform for you and with you over coming releases.
 
We have also had the opportunity this month to participate in an Industry Forum hosted by the Commonwealth and State and Territory Building Ministers. We were also invited to attend the Building Ministers Forum to discuss how we are looking to achieve better access to our standards for all users.
 
We are really pleased to be moving into these discussions with so much recognition of the importance of standards to the construction sector and a recognition that better access means much more than how content is made available. We are certain that by working together we will be able to achieve much more than walking these paths alone.


—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

Connect is live!

We are very excited to announce that our new, all-inclusive digital home, Connect, has arrived.

Standards Australia has been working hard to answer the calls from our contributors who have been asking for a better experience through our technology platforms.

This led us to Connect, our new one-stop-shop for all the information our contributors need. Together with our users, we’ve worked hard to create a better online experience for all committee members, nominating organisations and Standards Australia staff. See our Connect launch video.

Connect is the first stage of our new contributor platform that will ultimately replace The Hub, Livelink and other systems used by our contributors on the standards development side.

This is a huge leap forward, on a much longer journey, as we make it easier for you, as contributors, to work with us.

Standards Awards 2019 – nominate now

Each year, Standards Australia takes time out to recognise outstanding contributions to our work as Australia’s national standards body.
 
Individual and committee efforts are recognised as well as service in Australia and internationally. 

Nominations for the Standards Awards are managed through this link.

Nominations close on Friday 22 March.

Global experts discuss robots

Global leaders in all things robotics are collaborating to further develop the standards guiding the ever-expanding use of robots. A working group of the international technical committee developing these International Standards, ISO/TC 299/WG 3, Industrial Safety, met in Melbourne this month to progress the guidance documents.

Find out more on our website.

Dementia-inclusive communities leadership roundtable

This report outlines the discussion, outcomes and proposed next steps from the Dementia-Inclusive Communities Forum hosted by Standards Australia last December. It’s set up to guide further engagement, and to help inform stakeholders of the future standards development opportunities for Australia and for any international participation in ISO/TC 314, Aging Societies, and its work program around dementia-inclusive communities and aging workforces.

Download the report from our website (PDF).

Securing a 21st century energy grid

The evolution of the energy and electrical sector in Australia is being significantly boosted with major developments, particularly in the rollout of new technology to more traditional infrastructure.

Find out more on our website.

Spigit – innovation management standards

Should Australia participate in the international development of innovation management standards?

For many years, Australian stakeholders have been actively engaged in the development and adoption of international management system standards to support businesses in a number of key areas: quality, energy, occupational health and safety, and the environment, to name a few.
 
As Australia's innovation activities exponentially increase, would we benefit from a set of management guidelines specifically focussed on innovation? Does it make sense for Australia to participate in the international development of an innovation management system standard?
 
Standards Australia has received a proposal to participate on the international committee ISO/TC 279, Innovation Management.
 
We are seeking feedback from all interested parties on whether participation is in Australia’s best interest.
 
As part of our ongoing efforts to be easier to work with and more transparent, the Incubator is using this proposal to trial the concept of crowd-sourcing approval for project proposals online.
 
Visit the project profile page on Spigit to view the proposal and submit your feedback on Australia’s participation on ISO/TC 279.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from January and February (PDF):

  • Members welcome Global Review of Aid for Trade preparations
  • Better building with new International Standards for BIM
  • Who needs AI

Sector update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

VicForests audit approves Responsible Wood standard

State-owned VicForests has announced its successful three-year re-certification under the Responsible Wood standard.

An audit, conducted across the business in December 2018, recommended VicForests recertification highlighting its thorough workplace and contractor safety standards, contractor management and continued contribution to research. 

All major commercial native timber harvesting enterprises across Australia are certified under this system including Queensland, New South Wales, Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia.

The Responsible Wood standard is endorsed by the international Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC), the largest such system in the world which covers more than 300 million ha of forest, has 49 national members and equates to around two-thirds of the world's total certified forest area.

2019-02-27
Location: Newsletter
Description:

In this Edition

CEO report

Connect is live!

Standards Awards 2019 – nominate now

Global experts discuss robots

Dementia-inclusive communities leadership roundtable

Securing a 21st century energy grid

Spigit – innovation management standards

International update

Sector update

Drafts open for comment

VicForests audit approves Responsible Wood standard

CEO report

This has been a very busy, exciting month not just for us at Standards Australia but for every one of our contributors.

We are pleased to have launched Connect, our new contributor platform which has been months, if not years in the making.

Connect will eventually replace The Hub, which has been our contributor platform for many years. It has been built with contributors, for contributors and we are incredibly proud to be able to start with this first stage release as part of our overall objective to make it easier for our contributors to work with us.

As with many technology projects, we had a hiccup along the way when the platform didn’t behave as we had expected when we moved from our test to live environment. This was far from ideal, particularly given we lost access to The Hub for a short time.

On the upside, the team pulled together and worked tirelessly until the issues were resolved and we were able to go live on a second attempt. Feedback so far has been great. Thank you all for your comments.

We look forward to continuing to build on this platform for you and with you over coming releases.

We have also had the opportunity this month to participate in an Industry Forum hosted by the Commonwealth and State and Territory Building Ministers. We were also invited to attend the Building Ministers Forum to discuss how we are looking to achieve better access to our standards for all users.

We are really pleased to be moving into these discussions with so much recognition of the importance of standards to the construction sector and a recognition that better access means much more than how content is made available. We are certain that by working together we will be able to achieve much more than walking these paths alone.


—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

Connect is live!

We are very excited to announce that our new, all-inclusive digital home, Connect, has arrived.

Standards Australia has been working hard to answer the calls from our contributors who have been asking for a better experience through our technology platforms.

This led us to Connect, our new one-stop-shop for all the information our contributors need. Together with our users, we’ve worked hard to create a better online experience for all committee members, nominating organisations and Standards Australia staff. See our Connect launch video.

Connect is the first stage of our new contributor platform that will ultimately replace The Hub, Livelink and other systems used by our contributors on the standards development side.

This is a huge leap forward, on a much longer journey, as we make it easier for you, as contributors, to work with us.

Standards Awards 2019 – nominate now

Each year, Standards Australia takes time out to recognise outstanding contributions to our work as Australia’s national standards body.

Individual and committee efforts are recognised as well as service in Australia and internationally.

Nominations for the Standards Awards are managed through this link.

Nominations close on Friday 22 March.

Global experts discuss robots

Global leaders in all things robotics are collaborating to further develop the standards guiding the ever-expanding use of robots. A working group of the international technical committee developing these International Standards, ISO/TC 299/WG 3, Industrial Safety, met in Melbourne this month to progress the guidance documents.

Find out more on our website.

Dementia-inclusive communities leadership roundtable

This report outlines the discussion, outcomes and proposed next steps from the Dementia-Inclusive Communities Forum hosted by Standards Australia last December. It’s set up to guide further engagement, and to help inform stakeholders of the future standards development opportunities for Australia and for any international participation in ISO/TC 314, Aging Societies, and its work program around dementia-inclusive communities and aging workforces.

Download the report from our website (PDF).

Securing a 21st century energy grid

The evolution of the energy and electrical sector in Australia is being significantly boosted with major developments, particularly in the rollout of new technology to more traditional infrastructure.

Find out more on our website.

Spigit – innovation management standards

Should Australia participate in the international development of innovation management standards?

For many years, Australian stakeholders have been actively engaged in the development and adoption of international management system standards to support businesses in a number of key areas: quality, energy, occupational health and safety, and the environment, to name a few.

As Australia's innovation activities exponentially increase, would we benefit from a set of management guidelines specifically focussed on innovation? Does it make sense for Australia to participate in the international development of an innovation management system standard?

Standards Australia has received a proposal to participate on the international committee ISO/TC 279, Innovation Management.

We are seeking feedback from all interested parties on whether participation is in Australia’s best interest.

As part of our ongoing efforts to be easier to work with and more transparent, the Incubator is using this proposal to trial the concept of crowd-sourcing approval for project proposals online.

Visit the project profile page on Spigit to view the proposal and submit your feedback on Australia’s participation on ISO/TC 279.

International update

Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from January and February (PDF):

  • Members welcome Global Review of Aid for Trade preparations
  • Better building with new International Standards for BIM
  • Who needs AI

Sector update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

Drafts open for comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

VicForests audit approves Responsible Wood standard

State-owned VicForests has announced its successful three-year re-certification under the Responsible Wood standard.

An audit, conducted across the business in December 2018, recommended VicForests recertification highlighting its thorough workplace and contractor safety standards, contractor management and continued contribution to research.

All major commercial native timber harvesting enterprises across Australia are certified under this system including Queensland, New South Wales, Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia.

The Responsible Wood standard is endorsed by the international Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC), the largest such system in the world which covers more than 300 million ha of forest, has 49 national members and equates to around two-thirds of the world's total certified forest area.

2019-02-07
Location: Australia
Description:

Standards Australia wins right to move beyond exclusive distribution arrangements with SAI Global

07 February 2019

Statement

In late December 2018, an independent arbitration determined that any extended distribution agreement with SAI Global will be non-exclusive.  This means that Standards Australia can now take steps to move beyond the exclusive distribution arrangements that have been in place with SAI Global since 2003.
 
A process is continuing in relation to how the arbitrator's decision will be implemented. Standards Australia is committed to getting to the end of this process as quickly as it can, sometime later this year.
 
In the meantime, Australian Standards® will continue to be distributed through SAI Global.
 
Richard Brooks, Standards Australia’s Chairman, said the arbitration decision was an exciting step towards delivering greater value and improving access to Australian Standards®, while building capability and external partnerships to deliver new methods of distribution to end users.
 
“Standards Australia has been aiming to make Australian communities safer, help our economy grow and connect our nation to the world for almost 100 years,” Mr Brooks said.
 
“Improving every aspect of our work – from how we connect with contributors, to how we foster innovation and how we distribute our content has been a major part of our agenda.”
 
“However, as the world of publishing changes, we must also change to continue our strong, positive contribution to the community and empower those who use our content.”
 
Standards Australia is exploring additional distribution channels as the first stage of its transition. 
 
The second stage of transition will start with an open process of consultation with stakeholders to understand how the current and future distribution models can deliver easier access for those who use Standards Australia’s content.
 
Bronwyn Evans, Standards Australia’s Chief Executive Officer emphasised the importance of stakeholder engagement as part of the transition.
 
“Operating an open and transparent process is our core business. This is an opportunity to design a Standards Australia of the future that relies on all interested stakeholders, whose support and contribution will be vital in the improvement and innovation in the distribution of Australian Standards®,” Dr Evans said.
 
“We strongly believe we can deliver better solutions by working together.”
 
Standards Australia will be providing details on its consultation over the coming months.


 

2019-01-27
Location: Newsletter
Description:

In this Edition

CEO Report

Standards Awards 2019 – Nominations now open!

Changes to the Standards Australia Academy

Pipeline of improvements for the transmission of liquid and gas petroleum

Enabling digital trade – recommendations report released

In Conversation with Susan Jaques

Delivering changes to Governance

Feedback sought: Public Comment pilot

Sector Update

Drafts Open for Comment

Standards Australia endorses Responsible Wood trust mark

CEO Report

In my E-News report in December 2018 I had the chance to thank the many contributors who took the time to be part of our committees, give inputs into public comment processes, share an idea for an incubator project or be a “guinea-pig” for the contributor portal pilot.

In my first report for 2019 I want to give very specific thanks to two committees who powered through very significant programs of work in 2018. These two committees were part of the reason we were able to publish a record 65 standards in December – it was only a three week month.

Thank you to FP-002 (Fire Detection, Warning, Control and Intercom Systems) Chaired by Chris Orr with Eui Kang as Project Manager who published fourteen documents for the National Construction Code (NCC) – 2019. And thank you to CE-012 (Aggregates and Rock for Engineering Purposes) Chaired by Peter Clark with John Anderson as Project Manager, who published two revisions and eight amendments in December, four months ahead of the planned publication date.

We know that all committee contributors want their efforts to result in fast and effective projects. This was the impetus for the Technical Governance Review (TGR) that we started in 2017. As we work through the TGR implementation action plan our objective is to be more open, more strategic and more proactively focused on quality assurance. This is essential for us to remain relevant and to adapt to the demands of the future.

Thank you to the fantastic team at Standards Australia and to all of the stakeholders who worked with us in 2018. Only in continuing to work together can we deliver the standards that keep Australians safe and our economy efficient.
—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

Standards Awards 2019 – Nominations now open!

The 2019 Standards Awards are now open for nominations. Individuals and committees of Standards Australia, and accredited standards development organisations, are eligible for nomination across six award categories:

  • W.R. Hebblewhite Medal;
  • Meritorious Contribution Award – National;
  • Meritorious Contribution Award – International;
  • Emerging Leader Award;
  • Outstanding Committee Award; and
  • Innovation Award.

To make a nomination, visit our Standards Awards page.

Changes to the Standards Australia Academy

Many contributors will be aware of the Academy online learning platform provided by Standards Australia. This platform is for committee members and committee chairs to ensure their involvement in standards development is as productive and effective as possible.

To ensure this learning tool continues to deliver for the thousands of committee members there is an upgrade scheduled for Monday 4 March of this year with some exciting changes. The new platform will provide easy access to learning content, facilitate enrolment in face to face training across Australia, deliver webinars, host a resource library for supporting materials, and will be even more compatible with mobile devices.

Book your free training courses now.

How to write an Australian Standard
This one day course (09:30–16:00) covers the principles of writing clear, performance-based standards, with exercises in-class to delve further into some of the finer points of drafting. This workshop promotes an understanding of:

  • Expressions and language used within an Australian Standard.
  • Drafting of specific clauses within an Australian Standard.
  • Referencing styles and formats.
  • Appendices.
  • Amendments.
  • International adoptions.
  1. workshops:
    Melbourne, Tuesday 5 March
    Level 18/2 Southbank Blvd, Southbank VIC 3006
    Sydney, Thursday 7 March
    Level 9, 20 Bridge St, Sydney NSW 2000
    Brisbane, Tuesday 12 March
    3/288 Edward St, Brisbane City QLD 4000

    Please email academy@standards.org.au to enrol.

Pipeline of improvements for the transmission of liquid and gas petroleum

The extensive network of pipelines carrying gas and liquid petroleum for use in Australia is the focus of several recently published standards assisting the sector to remain efficient and innovative in years to come.

Learn more on our website.

Enabling digital trade – recommendations report released

Realising the potential of digital trade across Australia and the South East Asia region is the focus of a Recommendations Report released recently by Standards Australia.

Learn more on our website.

In Conversation with Susan Jaques

Susan Jaques has a degree in civil engineering, and works as an independent consultant in the areas of risk, quality, and competencies for the infrastructure industry. Susan has been involved in the Australian pipeline industry for over 20 years, has been on Standards committees for 15 years, is the Chair of the Australian Standards Committee ME-038 Petroleum Pipelines, and is an active member of all of the subcommittees associated with ME-038.


Standards Australia: What do standards deliver for your sector?
Susan Jaques: In the energy sector, particularly transporting hydrocarbon fuels, it is essential that Standards are utilised by everyone in the industry. Standards deliver a framework of consistent expectations – those of us working in the industry have a reliable set of requirements that are kept up to date through an active revision process.

SA: Was 2018 as productive as expected?
SJ: We knew 2018 would be a busy year with numerous competing priorities for our committees. 2018 ended up as a high achievement year for ME-038 and all of its subcommittees. The committee published four revisions in 2018 (AS 4822, and AS 2885 Parts 0, 1, 6). In addition to those publications in 2018, we were also in the middle of revisions to 4 other Standards in our portfolio: AS 3862, and AS 2885 Parts 2, 3 and 5.

SA: What does 2019 hold for your industry?
SJ: The look ahead for 2019 shows yet another productive year, with the next four Standards revisions expected to be published within the next twelve months. In amongst those updates, we are also keeping an eye on the new (and revisited) possibilities of transporting hydrogen in our existing infrastructure, as well as carbon storage possibilities. There are intriguing possibilities out there for a carbon-reduced future, and how our existing safe pipelines can be best utilised in a smooth and efficient transition to lower-carbon energy sources.

SA: What does the future of standardisation look like?
SJ: The future of standardisation, in a lot of ways, should be more of the same, but better. It’s important that the basic tenet of Standardisation prevails: that it benefits the industry by streamlining the approach through a minimum expectation that every participant strives to meet. One of the ways it can improve is potentially through crowd-sourced and real-time feedback for revisions and updates, perhaps utilising technology to have ongoing discussions about clauses and sections that may be causing misinterpretation in real-world applications. The text that was put together in a meeting room rather than in the field can sometimes be interpreted very differently by those who weren’t in the room. Regardless of any challenges, the amount of technology being trialled at Standards Australia and the pursuit of innovation is exciting and the future is certainly looking bright.

Delivering changes to Governance

Our work program to address the findings of the Technical Governance Review is well underway, and various changes are being rolled out this month.

Committee Chair Policy
Standards Australia has drafted changes to the policies for Committee Chairs to better support this key role in Standards Development. Following review by the Standards Development and Accreditation Committee (SDAC), we are opening the updated version of SG-002 for consultation.

Register on our new Public Comment platform, review the changes and submit a comment.

We are also seeking feedback on the platform itself. Let us know how public comment worked for you by emailing comment@standards.org.au or by taking this quick survey.

Changes to proposals now in place
As mentioned in previous E-News, we’ve made some changes to the way we assess proposals for standards development work. Proposals can now be submitted at any time – there are no fixed submission dates. Also, the finalised proposals will be approved monthly rather than the old 6-monthly cycle.

These changes mean we can better respond to the needs of stakeholders, since our technical committees can kick off projects more quickly. We’re maintaining the requirements to assess proposals, to ensure every project successfully delivers benefits to Australia.

Since there are other opportunities to improve the proposal process, further projects are underway to make things better.

Our Stakeholder Engagement team is always available to assist you with developing successful proposals. Contact them at sem@standards.org.au.

More information
For information on the progress of projects under our Technical Governance Review (TGR) Implementation Plan for FY2019 (PDF), view the Quarter 2 Progress Report on our website.

Feedback sought: Public Comment pilot

The new platform for Public Comment was piloted before the holidays, for the standard AS 4632, Over-pressure and under-pressure shut-off devices, and has already received some really positive and insightful feedback so far.

The system is undergoing further enhancements in the meantime, including:

  1. Attaching supporting documents along with your comment
  2. Single sign on (SSO) with other Standards Australia applications
  3. Integration with other systems
  4. Support for Project Managers to upload comments on behalf of contributors when needed

Standards Australia is encouraging all committee members to trial the platform and let us know how public comment worked for you by emailing comment@standards.org.au or by taking this quick survey.

Sector Update

Access the latest standards development news in your industry sector via our Sectors page.

Drafts Open for Comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

SDO News

Standards Australia endorses Responsible Wood trust mark

AS one of five accredited standards development organisations, Responsible Wood is subject to regular surveillance audits to ensure its scheme is independent, credible, transparent and technically competent.

The Standards Development and Accreditation Committee has appointed an independent auditor to oversee the Responsible Wood’s ‘check compliance’ to Standard Development Organisation (SDO) requirements.

The surveillance audit provides Responsible Wood with an opportunity to demonstrate its ongoing commitment to standards development.

Standards Australia is the owner of the standards and trademarks.

As one of five accredited SDOs, Responsible Wood is licensed to develop Australian Standards for forest certification through its ongoing SDAC accreditation.

“With the rebrand from the Australian Forestry Standard to Responsible Wood, we are the only forest certification scheme that has the endorsement of Standards Australia for sustainable forest management and chain of custody for forest products,” CEO Simon Dorries said.

 

2018-11-14
Location: Australia
Description:

Distribution arrangements for Standards Australia content

14 November 2018

Statement

The initial term of Standards Australia’s contract with SAI Global for the publication, distribution, marketing and sale of Standards Australia’s content is due to end on 16 December 2018. There is an option to extend the term for a further 5 years, exercisable by SAI Global in certain circumstances.

Standards Australia and SAI Global do not agree on how the processes related to the option should operate.

Over the last few months, Standards Australia and SAI Global have been working through the processes in the contract that relate to the option to extend the term and this is still underway.

In the event that these processes have not been concluded before the expiry of the initial term on 16 December, SAI Global will continue to publish, distribute, market and sell Standards Australia’s content until such time as the process has been concluded.

Standards Australia and SAI Global will keep stakeholders and customers updated.

Standards Australia recognises the difficulty that this may cause customers, is committed to resolving the processes expeditiously, and apologises for the lack of certainty at this time.

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