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Underwriters Laboratories

UL is a global independent safety science company with more than a century of expertise innovating safety solutions from the public adoption of electricity to new breakthroughs in sustainability, renewable energy and nanotechnology. Dedicated to promoting safe living and working environments, UL helps safeguard people, products and places in important ways, facilitating trade and providing peace of mind.

Locations: Global - Global
 
2020-07-28
Location: Webinar
Description:

UL WEBINAR - The Adoption of IEC 62368-1 3rd Edition & IEC 62368-3 (Jul 28, 2020).

Less than 6 months left until IEC 62368-1 -based standards will replace IEC 60065 and IEC 60950-1 -based standards in EU, NA and elsewhere.

We welcome you to join UL experts to gain insight and the latest updates.

https://www.ul.com/events/adoption-iec-62368-1-3rd-edition-and-iec-62368-3

2020-07-06
Location: Newsletter
Description:
  • Attached is the new update / infosheet that was available via download at the site I referenced - https://www.ul.com/offerings/62368-1-hazard-based-safety-standard .
  • Also at the site is a link to the 62368-1 UL Toolkit, where for $795 you get access to (a) the UL Transition Guide on IEC 62368-1 Third Edition (approx. 80 pages) – Updated (March 2020), and (b) a downloadable copy of the latest UL 62368-1 standard (Edition No. 3).  However, it’s for a single user and is not a site license.  Note, if you don’t want or need a copy of the Guide & Standard, the other 62368 UL Papers (below) in the Toolkit are freely available via registration / download (free, but you need to register).   https://62368-ul-solutions.com/register.html

o   CSA / UL / IEC 62368-1 Ed. No. 3 Certification Impact Analysis (52 pages) – Updated (March 2020).

o   Use of AV/ICT Components certified to legacy (EN 60065 and EN 60950-1) standards in AV/ICT Equipment intended for EU Market Access after 2020-12-20 – New (April 2020)

o   Perspective: Movement toward an IEC 62368-1:2018-based standard in Europe – Update! – Updated (March 2020).

o   IEC 60950-22 to 62368-1 and IEC 60950-23 to 62368-1 Roadmaps – Updated (June 2020).

o   IEC 62368-3 Backgrounder & Update! – Updated (April 2020).

o   Impact Analyses on the 2020 Editions of NFPA 70 (NEC) and NFPA 75 (ITE / Data Centers) – New (May 2020).

 

File attachments:
2020-05-02
Location: Newsletter
Description:

In recent years, installation codes and standards have been updated to address modern energy storage applications which often use new energy storage technologies.

Read more

Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) System - Retrofitting/replacing with New Batteries

Knowing which batteries can be replaced with uninterruptible power supply systems, depends on considering a number of codes, product listings, markings and installation instructions.

Read more

Q&A: Fire Doors for Linen and Waste Chutes

Determining code compliance for linen and waste chute access doors.

Read more

Q&A: UL Critical Component Identification in Fire Resistance-rated Designs

Have you ever wondered why some items within UL Certification designs have asterisks following an item’s description? In this Q&A, we’ll explain what their meaning is.

Read more

News Brief: UL Launches Upgraded Suite of Services for Firestopping

Confirm code compliance with a suite of fire barrier management services dedicated to building fire compartmentation requirements.

Read more

News Brief: UL Product iQ Premium Features- Free for Authorities Having Jurisdiction

Product iQ offers premium features to code authorities (AHJs) free of charge. Log into your Product iQ account to request a free upgrade.

Read more

Webinars of interest

Building a pandemic response plan with UL

Overview of NFPA 1851 Verification

UL Canada Evaluation Reports – An invaluable tool for your innovative products

Fire Suppression Systems and Standards

Spanish language webinars

Serie de webinars: Aportes de UL a la industria de protección contra incendios

  • UL y su experiencia en la protección contra incendios
  • Cómo utilizar y aprovechar la base de certificados UL
  • Normas UL en la Industria de la Protección contra Fuego en Latinoamérica

Editor news

We are honored to announce that Bruce Johnson, Editor of The Code Authority newsletter, has been invited to join the William Henry Merrill Society under the title “Distinguished Member of Technical Staff” Class of 2020. Bruce is being honored for his technical excellence and overall contribution to UL’s public safety mission. Congratulations Bruce, on this well-deserved recognition.

2019-12-10
Location: Newsletter
Description:

UL Extends Effective Date for Smoke Alarm and Smoke Detector Manufacturers

UL announced via a customer bulletin that the effective dates for ANSI/UL 217, Smoke Alarms, 8th Ed. and ANSI/UL 268, Smoke Detectors for Fire Alarm Systems, 7th Ed. have been extended to June 30, 2021.

Learn more

Managing Editor - Bruce Johnson

Bruce Johnson is the Managing Editor of the Code Authority Newsletter. For further information or questions, please contact UL code experts here.

2019-10-02
Location: Article
Description:

UL 4600 Draft Puts Safety Onus on AV Hopefuls

By Junko Yoshida, 10.02.19

The hype cycle of autonomous vehicles (AVs) might have already passed the peak of inflated expectations. The next step for AV vendors is to level with the public, to acknowledge that there's a critical question that still lacks an answer: How safe is safe enough?

Not coincidentally, Underwriters’ Laboratories (UL) has just released its draft of UL 4600 — the first comprehensive safety standard for autonomous products.

UL 4600 isn’t your grandfather’s rulebook. Anyone looking for technical specifications to quickly build a safe AV, will be barking up the wrong tree. UL 4600 isn’t that.

This standard lists no specifications, stipulates no hardware or software (no mandates for types of sensors, SoCs or embedded software), and provides no prescribed guidance as to the proper development process. Instead, UL 4600 offers a guide to “build the safety case” for your AV.

In short, other existing safety standards prescribe “how to do safety” by following step 1, step 2 and step 3. UL 4600, in contrast, is about “how you’ve done it [safety] enough,” explained Phil Koopman, CTO of Edge Case Research, and a professor at Carnegie Mellon University.

Asked about the basic design principles of the UL standard, Koopman, one of UL 4600’s authors, told us, “If you can't say what it means to be safe, and you can't explain why you think the system is actually safe, then probably your system is not safe.” A safety case is “an important piece of designing safe systems,” he noted.


Why another safety standard is needed
As Koopman noted, “Self-driving cars will change how we'll have to do safety compared to human-driven vehicles in some fundamental ways.” He stressed, “It should be no surprise if our approach to safety standards changes as well. But it's important not to forget the hard-won lessons and engineering approaches we already use.”

UL 4600 makes it very clear that it’s not the only safety standard AV designers need.  “You also need good engineering methods such as those discussed in other standards [including IEC 61508, ISO 26262 and ISO/PAS 21448 (SOTIF)],” said Koopman. “I expect developers will use both conventional standards such as ISO 26262 together with UL 4600.”

UL 4600 markedly differs from other safety standards in that it focuses on full autonomy, without human assistance.

 

For example, existing safety standards are designed for vehicles that ultimately have a human driver responsible for safe operation. In contrast, UL 4600 deals with full autonomy head-on. The draft standard explains, “complete removal of humans from performing aspects (including supervision) of autonomous item operation brings with it numerous additional concerns.” UL 4600 addresses these “additional concerns.”

 

2019-09-13
Location: Newsletter
Description:

Improve Building Safety with Certification of Emergency Responder Communication Enhancement

Emergency first responders use portable radios as a critical communication tool for fireground command and control. Learn about available technologies and code requirements for each.

Read more


2020 NEC Addresses Energy Storage System Safety – What Code Officials Need to Know

National Electrical Code (NEC) Article 706 covering energy storage systems was initially limited to permanently installed energy storage systems. 2020 NEC Article 706 will expand in scope to include significant new requirements.

Read more


Pollution Control Units for Commercial Cooking Systems: Then and Now

Pollution control units are often required for commercial cooking hoods to reduce harmful emissions. Learn about the basic code requirements.

Read more


Reconditioned Electrical Equipment, a 2020 NEC Guide

The 2017 edition of the NEC added a new informational note to Section 110.3(A)(1) stating “Equipment may be new, reconditioned, refurbished, or remanufactured” while a new subsection was added to Section 110.21(A) that addressed equipment marking for reconditioned equipment.

Read more


Cooling Towers: Preventing Legionnaires Disease and Mitigating Risk

Cooling towers can be a source for harmful diseases. Learn what code authorities can do to reduce this risk.

Read more


Do You Know the Key Code Requirements for High-speed Doors and Egress?

High-speed doors offer unique benefits and challenges. Learn how to determine code compliance.

Read more


Q&A


News

UL Offers Thermal Barrier Certification

Read more


Managing Editor - Bruce Johnson

Bruce Johnson is the Managing Editor of the Code Authority Newsletter. For further information or questions, please contact UL code experts here.

UL LLC
333 Pfingsten Road
Northbrook, IL 60062

UL and the UL logo
are trademarks of UL LLC © 2019

Archived Events: (Click to expand/collapse)
2019-03-28
Location: Article
Description:

The Complex Quest to Write a Robocar Driving Test

Self-driving cars are patrolling our roads, and it's about time someone made a proper engineering standard that they can be held to.

Self-driving cars are here,” Dmitri Dolgov told the audience at MIT Technology Review’s EmTech Digital event this week. “It's not a matter of when or if. It’s a matter of how fast we can grow and how fast we can scale this technology in a responsible manner.”

Waymo’s CTO is right: The outfit that started off as Google’s self-driving car project is running a limited robotaxi service in the Phoenix metro area. (The company still uses safety drivers, so the cars aren’t yet totally driverless. Dolgov also told the audience that the company has tech yet to crack.) And it’s not alone. GM Cruise plans to launch a service this year. Uber is testing in Pittsburgh. Lyft and Aptiv have a limited self-driving service in Las Vegas. Nuro’s delivery bots are hauling groceries around Texas and Arizona. May Mobility is running robo-shuttles in Detroit.

So for the public sharing the roads with these things, a few long lurking questions are now more pressing than ever: How do we know these things are safe? The companies say they are, but how can they prove it to us?

One thing is for sure: The way we certify human drivers ain’t going to cut it. Just because software can pull off a three-point turn once doesn’t mean it will be able to do it every time, in variable conditions. Or that the people who built it even know why it worked. Algorithms are black boxes; developers can see whether a computer is doing something right, but they can’t necessarily tell if the computer understands why it’s right. If something goes wrong with self-driving software, though, researchers are going to need to understand how it works—so they can fix it.

A different sort of test, then, is in order. One made not for people, but for machines. That’s why some people in the self-driving space are talking about setting a new kind of standard.

The WIRED Guide to Self-Driving Cars

For decades, engineers who build anything, including software, have used standards to verify the quality of their work. Whether those standards are voluntary or government mandated, they’re less rules for what to do than processes for making sure that what you do works. Underwriters Laboratory, based in Illinois, writes standards and certifies that companies are following them for just about any product you can think of: outdoor furniture, horticultural lighting and grow systems, armored cables, robotic equipment, factory-built fireplaces, tin-clad fire doors. Check your favorite American electronic product or appliance and chances are you’ll find a safety certification stamp from Underwriters or a similar organization. (If you don’t, maybe rethink your choice.) Another group called the International Organization of Standards came out with a new standard called ISO 26262 eight years ago, which outlines safety in electrical or electronic car systems.

But no one has made this kind of standard, this variety of test, for a self-driving car. Underwriters Laboratories and a safety software company called Edge Case Research would like to change that, and quickly. They have a plan to bring together all sorts of players in this budding industry to do what others have done for automotive software and those tin-clad fire doors. The groups plan to write a new safety standard for autonomous products called—and this just rolls off the tongue—UL 4600.

Right now, UL 4600 is a draft, written by collaborators with backgrounds in standards writing and aviation and automotive software tech. To make the final version, they need to bring together a “supergroup” panel of advisers. They’d like to do that this spring.

“I have a balance of interests that I look for,” says Deborah Prince, the standards process manager for Underwriters Laboratories. She has put together many advisory panels for the standards that the company oversees. “I’m looking for my producers, I might have software people in there, insurance people, regulators. I want the right cross section.” For a self-driving software standard, that cross section might be made up of big developers like Waymo and Uber, small self-driving startups, independent researchers, car companies, and maybe even a few staffers from the Department of Transportation.

 (Waymo could not say whether it has been in conversation with UL about this safety standard, but Uber spokesperson Sarah Abboud said the company was aware of UL’s activity and is “interested in getting involved in any industry standard work that brings self-driving vehicles to market in a safe, responsible way.”)

Together, the groups want that advisory panel to come up with a standard that would force those building self-driving technology to explain how their cars can get through bloopers and accidents, even without a driver at the wheel. Tire blows out? No one’s going to grab the steering wheel. Vehicle catches on fire and the passenger is asleep in the back? No one’s there to wake them up and get them out. Developers would have to lay out precisely how their software works around those autonomy-specific problems.

“The standard says, 'This is a list of all the things that it means to do the right thing, and you have to explain to me how you're going to get it right,'” says Philip Koopman, a cofounder of Edge Case Research and an electrical and computer engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University, who is helping to write the standard. “I don't really care how. But you're not allowed to blow it off.”

The standard has a ways to go, but its makers want the process to move quickly. If the group comes together this spring, it might update the draft standard by midyear and solicit public feedback. It could even publish a standard by the end of the 2019—warp speed for a process that usually takes years.

Then, though, would come the biggest challenge: getting companies to use the thing. Because a standard without adherents is like a church without congregants—kind of depressing and not very useful. One hurdle facing the group is that Underwriters isn’t yet strongly established in the automotive space. Also, many aren’t convinced it’s not better to just rejigger ISO’s 26262 standard for autonomous driving.

But the upside for this standard—or any safety standard, really—is that following it could mean a safer self-driving car. One that’s far better than a teen who just passed his first driving test—and can prove it.


 

Aarian Marshall writes about autonomous vehicles, transportation policy, urban planning, and everyone’s favorite topic: How to destroy traffic. (You can’t, really.) She’s an aspiring bike commuter and New Yorker going soft on San Francisco, where she’s based. Before WIRED, Marshall wrote for The Atlantic’s CityLab, GOOD, and Agri-Pulse, an agriculture... Read more

Staff Writer

 

 

2019-02-20
Location: Newsletter
Description:

Certified Antifreeze Solutions for Use in Fire Sprinkler Systems

Listed antifreeze for fire sprinkler systems is now an available option for installations in cold environments.

Read more

UL Product iQ: The next generation directory

Sign-up for Product iQ today. UL’s new improved database with complimentary access to UL product certification data.

Read more

UL Special Inspection Program for Firestop and Related Systems

UL offers a special inspection program for firestop and related systems to help ensure code compliance.

Read more

10th Annual India Fire Council Meetings a Success

Learn more about the informative presentations and live fire demonstrations at the new UL-JFL suppression test facility.

Read more

Codes and Regulatory Services Employee Profile

Meet Ghaith Bakir, UL Regulatory Engineer.

Read more

Q&A

UL's Enhanced Certification Mark

UL answers common questions about the Enhanced Certification Mark and explains UL Listed and UL Certified labels.

Learn More

EVENTS

Complimentary Webinars

Read more

Winter Safety Tips from UL.

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Code authorities count on our technical expertise to provide code compliant installations.

Managing Editor - Bruce Johnson

Bruce Johnson is the Managing Editor of the Code Authority Newsletter. For further information or questions, please contact UL code experts here.

 

2018-04-24
Description:

1 Scope

1.1 These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 1000 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

1.2 These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels primarily intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, equipment for load management applications, fountain control, irrigation equipment control, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery. Also covered are industrial control panels intended for control of permanently installed electrical equipment for aquatic playgrounds, permanently installed electrical equipment associated with commercial water park rides, wave pools and similar installations, and permanently installed electrical equipment associated with commercial and large residential swimming pools and in-ground spas.

1.3 This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals. These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

1.4 An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

1.5 An evaluation of the adequacy of the controls and protective devices contained in an industrial control panel for supervision and proper functioning of the controlled loads or equipment is not covered by the requirements in this standard. Such evaluations are covered by the standards applicable to the complete piece of utilization equipment.

1.6 The evaluation of a pre-fabricated building, structure, or platforms supplied with industrial control panels are not covered by the requirements in this standard.

1.7 Fire pump controllers are covered by the Standard for Fire Pump Controllers, UL 218.

1.8 Equipment intended for use in hazardous locations, as defined in the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, are covered by the Standard for Explosion-Proof and Dust-Ignition-Proof Electrical Equipment for Use in Hazardous (Classified) Locations, UL 1203.

1.9 Industrial control panels incorporating intrinsic safety barriers and intended for connection to circuits residing in hazardous locations are covered by the Standard for Industrial Control Panels Relating to Hazardous (Classified) Locations, UL 698A.

1.10 Motor control centers, including motor control center sections and units, or equipment intended for field installation into a motor control center are covered by the Standard for Motor Control Centers, UL 845.

1.11 Assemblies of electrical control units or equipment containing electrical control units for fire-protective signaling systems are covered by the Standard for Control Units and Accessories for Fire Alarm Systems, UL 864.

1.12 A freestanding assembly of circuit breakers and busses for control of electric light and power circuits or equipment intended for field installation in dead-front switchboards are covered by the Standard for Switchboards, UL 891.

1.13 Equipment intended to supply automatic illumination, power, or both, to critical areas and equipment essential to safety of human life is covered by the Standard for Emergency Lighting and Power Equipment, UL 924.

1.14 Control equipment for use with swimming pools and spas is covered by the Standard for Electric Spas, Equipment Assemblies, and Associated Equipment, UL 1563.

1.15 Portable control panels containing switches, overcurrent protection, and cord connected via attachment plugs and receptacles for use at carnivals, circuses, fairs, exhibition halls, motion picture and television studios, theaters, construction sites and similar locations are covered by the Standard for Portable Power-Distribution Equipment, UL 1640.

1.16 Equipment for the control of fuel cells, photovoltaic systems, or utility interactive systems are covered by the Standard for Inverters, Converters, Controllers and Interconnection System Equipment for Use With Distributed Energy Resources, UL 1741.

1.17 Enclosures or pedestals containing terminals for connection of power circuit conductors are covered by the Standard for Termination Boxes, UL 1773.

1.18 Emergency alarm equipment or control panels containing emergency alarm equipment are covered by the Standard for General-Purpose Signaling Devices and Systems, UL 2017.

1.19 Equipment for gas or vapor detection or control panels containing gas or vapor detection equipment is covered by the Standard for Gas and Vapor Detectors and Sensors, UL 2075.

1.20 Control panels containing predominately communication equipment, such as telephone equipment and intended for installation in accordance with Chapter 8 of the NEC, is evaluated to the Standard for Information Technology Equipment – Safety – Part 1: General Requirements, UL 60950-1.

1.21 Control equipment intended for use in physical access control systems, which provide an attended or unattended means of monitoring or controlling traffic through portals of a protected area for security purposes; or in key management systems, which regulate or control access to the use of a device by electrical, electronic or mechanical means, are covered by the Standard for Access Control System Units, UL 294.

1.22 Electrically operated or mechanically operated control equipment or enclosures intended for theft deterrent or warning purposes, such as detectors, security containers or alarms for merchandise or property, are covered by the Standard for Antitheft Alarms and Devices, UL 1037.

1.23 Equipment primarily intended to energize or de-energize electrical loads to achieve the desired use of electrical power is covered by the Standard for Energy Management Equipment, UL 916. Such equipment is intended to control electrical loads by responding to sensors or transducers monitoring power consumption, by sequencing, by cycling the loads through the use of preprogrammed data logic circuits, or any combination thereof.

2018-03-10
Description:

UL 1310: March 2018  Replaced UL 1310 August 2011 (link will take you to Techstreet notification)

2018-01-31
Location: Canada
Description:

UL Hazard Based Safety Engineering (amp; the Hazard Based Standard, IEC 62368-1)

New UL Research Report: Electromagnetic Modeling of Virtual Humans to Determine Heart Current Factors

By Thomas Burke, PE

"In this research report, we detail some initial 3-D electromagnetic modeling using full human body geometry to understand the pathways for current...

2017-11-21
Location: Canada
Description:

ULC Standards has released the following Standard Bulletin; please see attached link for details.

http://canada.ul.com/2017-standards-bulletins

Les Normes ULC ont publié le Bulletin sur les normes suivantes; s'il vous plaît consulter le lien ci-joint pour plus de détails

http://canada.ul.com/fr/normesulc/standardsbulletins/bulletins-sur-les-normes-2017/

2017-05-31
Location: Northbrook, IL
Description:

The Code Authority newsletter helps code authorities,
designers and contractors achieve safe, sustainable code compliant
installations.

Stationary Storage Battery Systems: New technologies and new safety challenges

New energy storage systems (ESS) are making their way into local jurisdictions.  Code authorities need to understand them so they can protect occupants and emergency responders.

Read more >

Enhanced Architectural Services:  Solutions for fire-resistance design problems

UL now offers Enhanced Architectural Services (EAS) to help architects, engineers and contractors address difficult fire-resistance related problems in the built environment.

Read more >

UL Develops Safety Requirements for E-Cigarette Electrical Systems

UL recently published UL 8139, Outline of Investigation for Electrical Systems of Electronic Cigarettes. UL 8139 evaluates the safety of the electrical, heating, battery and charging systems of these devices.

Read more >

Structural Wood Panels:  Can they be added to fire resistance rated walls?

See how the UL guide information can address this question by identifying what a structural wood panel is and where they can be used.

Read more >

Calendar of Events:  

Visit our calendar page for a list of upcoming conferences and events.  

To include your upcoming events, email Howard Hopper Please add “TCA Calendar” in the subject line

Read more >

UL-ese: Common terms used at UL


UL Collaborative Standards Development System (CSDS)

UL’s web-based standards development system used to submit proposals, comment, and vote on proposals at any time from any computer. CSDS is open to anyone interested in participating in the UL Standards development process and is the only channel to do so.

Preference Center | Online Policies

UL and the UL logo are trademarks of UL LLC © 2017

Contact Details

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UL LLC
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Northbrook, IL 60062
+1.800.595.9844
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2016-04-29
Description:

ULC Standards has released the following Standards Bulletins; please see attached link for details.

http://canada.ul.com/ulcstandards/standardsbulletins/2016standardsbulletins/

Application:
UL 840 - Start year: : 2005
Description:

1.1 These requirements cover an alternate approach to specifying through air and over surface spacings for electrical equipment through the use of the principles of insulation coordination.

1.2 The complete principles of insulation coordination involve the consideration of the combination of clearances, creepage distances, and the properties of solid insulation used to constitute the insulation system. The empirical data gathered thus far has been used to develop the requirements for clearances and creepage distances as presented in this standard. The data needed to develop the evaluation procedure for solid insulation is still being gathered. When available, this evaluation procedure will be added to this standard and is not expected to affect the requirements for clearances and creepage distances.

1.3 These requirements may be used as an alternate to required spacing levels specified in end-product standards. The end product standard spacing requirements may be based on use and systems where overvoltages are not controlled, or if controlled, the level of control is unknown.

1.4 These alternate requirements are intended to be applied to a particular product category if the standard covering the product category specifically references UL 840 or any of the requirements therein.

1.5 Users of these requirements may need to specify the overvoltage levels and the methods of control which will be utilized, and establish the pollution degree to which the product insulation system will be expected to be subjected.

1.6 It is not intended that the test values in this standard be employed for production line testing. However, users of these requirements will need to establish a means to ensure that production controls applied to permit the spacing reduction remain in effect during the manufacture of the product. This could include sample testing or physical measurements or another equivalent means.

1.7 Users of these requirements will additionally need to ensure that influencing factors not addressed in this standard, such as mechanical movement, field placement of conductive material, and product damage, will not affect the system for insulation coordination. Examples are the deformation of the enclosure, movement of the fittings for conduit or armored cable, or the improper installation of field wiring. Clearances and creepage distances at those locations must be verified for compliance by physical measurement in accordance with Section 10, Measurement of Clearance and Creepage Distances.

Notes:
Start Year / Status
Application: Adjustable Speed AC Motor Drives
UL 508C - Start year: : 2016
Description:

1.1 These requirements cover open or enclosed equipment that supplies power to control a motor or motors operating at a frequency or voltage different than that of the input supply. These requirements also cover power-supply modules, input/output modules, Silicon Controlled Rectifier (SCR) or Transistor output modules, dynamic braking units, and input/output accessory kits for use with power conversion equipment.

1.2 This equipment is for use in ordinary locations in accordance with Articles 430 and 440 of the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70.

1.3 These requirements cover devices rated 1500 volts or less.

1.4 Equipment intended for use in hazardous locations as defined by the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, shall be evaluated to the Standard for Industrial Control Equipment for Use in Hazardous (Classified) Locations, UL 698.

1.5 Deleted November 5, 2004

Notes:
Start Year / Status
Application: Air Conditioning Equipment
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
Application: Appliance, Household
UL 2595 - Start year: : 2015
Description:

General Requirements for Battery-Powered Appliances

Notes:

1 Scope

1.1 This standard applies to battery operated appliances. This standard applies to appliances incorporating detachable, integral and separable battery packs. The maximum rated voltage for appliances and battery packs is 75 V d.c.

1.2 This standard also applies to battery-powered appliances that are also operated and/or charged directly from the mains or a non-isolated source, including appliances provided with integral battery chargers. The additional considerations for these constructions are contained in Additional Requirements for Battery Operated Appliances with a Connection to Mains or a Non-isolated Source, Clause 22.

1.3 These requirements are structured so as to be used in conjunction with an end product standard. These requirements are not intended to provide comprehensive evaluation of a battery operated appliance independent of an end-product standard.

1.4 These requirements only address the potential risks unique to the utilization of a battery supply in a product. With the exception of appliances that also have a mains or non-isolated source, these requirements replace or modify the requirements associated with risk of fire and electric shock for mains powered versions of the appliance in the end product standard. See Indent A in Table d1.1.

1.5 Conditions of use of the product that are the basis for test and other evaluations in the standard are retained and applied, as far as practicable, to these products employing a battery supply.

1.6 Battery operated appliances not able to be connected to mains connected power covered by this standard are not considered to be grounded (class l) or double-insulated (class II), appliances and therefore are not required to have basic, supplementary or reinforced insulation. Electric shock hazard is considered to exist only between parts of opposite polarity.

1.7 Battery packs for appliances covered under this standard intended to be charged by a non-isolated charger are to be evaluated by this standard and the requirements for protection against electric shock of the end-product standard. When evaluating a battery pack for protection against electric shock, the construction and test requirements are to be assessed with the battery fitted to the intended charger.

1.8 When evaluating the risk of fire associated with detachable battery packs, consideration has been given to the fact that these battery packs are unattended energy sources and have been evaluated as such in this standard. Detachable battery packs evaluated by this standard are therefore considered to fulfill an effective protection against the risk of fire equivalent to that of the end-product standard.

1.9 Since battery packs for appliances are submitted to different use patterns (such as rough use, high charging and discharging currents) their safety can be evaluated only by this standard and not by using other standards for battery packs, such as the Standard for Household and Commercial Batteries, UL 2054, unless otherwise indicated in this standard.

1.10 This standard does not apply to the safety of battery chargers themselves. However, this standard covers the safe functioning of lithium-ion battery systems.

1.11 This standard also addresses requirements covering the use of lithium-ion cells employed in battery systems in appliances. The following is considered within the context of these requirements:

a)    These requirements address the risk of fire or explosion of these batteries but do not cover any possible hazards associated with toxicity nor potential hazards associated with transportation or disposal.

b)    Battery systems covered by these requirements are not intended to be serviced by the end user.

c)    These requirements are intended to provide comprehensive evaluation of a battery only if used in products covered by this standard.

d)    These requirements refer to and require parameters supplied in reference to the cells that establish conditions for safe use of those cells. Those parameters form the basis of acceptance criteria for a number of tests contained herein. This standard does not independently evaluate the safety of cells. These parameters, taken as a set, constitute the “Specified Operating Region” for a cell. There may be several sets of specified operating region(s).

1.12 This standard is not intended to apply to appliances using general purpose batteries installed by the user, and this standard alone will not be sufficient to ensure all hazards are considered for these products’ “battery packs”.

1.13 These requirements do not consider the effect of special applications (such as medical appliances) or special environments (such as hazardous locations).

1.14 These requirements have not been assessed for their suitability for product categories other than appliances such as information technology equipment, telecommunications, laboratory equipment, fire alarm, security systems, emergency lighting, and audio-video apparatus, and may be incomplete with respect to those categories.

1.15 These requirements address the safety of battery systems during storage and use including discharge and charge. These requirements are only considered to be supplementary requirements with respect to the risk of fire and electric shock in battery chargers. The safety of battery chargers for appliances are covered by other standards such as the Standard for Power Units Other Than Class 2, UL 1012, the Standard for Battery Chargers, CAN/CSA C22.2 No. 107.2, the Standard for Class 2 Power Units, UL 1310 , the Standard for Power Supplies With Extra-Low-Voltage Class 2 Outputs, CAN/CSA C22.2 No. 223, or the Standard for Information Technology Equipment – Safety – Part 1: General Requirements, UL 60950-1 and CAN/CSA C22.2 No. 60950-1.

1.16 These requirements make frequent reference to the conditions and tests of the end-product standard while also providing minimum conditions or severity of tests. These minimum conditions are not to be construed to imply equivalence to end-product requirements. Conditions or requirements of end-product standards are to prevail over the conditions or requirements of this standard, unless otherwise indicated in this standard.

1.17 This standard is not intended to cover appliances using lithium-metal type cells, and this standard alone will not be sufficient to ensure all hazards are considered for these types of cells. Lithium-ion cells are not lithium-metal cells.

Start Year / Status
Application: Battery Chargers
UL 1310 - Start year: : 2014
Description:

These requirements cover indoor and outdoor use Class 2 power supplies and battery chargers. These units utilize an isolating transformer and may incorporate components to provide an alternating- or direct-current output. Each output provides Class 2 power levels in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Maximum output voltage does not exceed 42.4 V peak for alternating current, 60 V for continuous direct current. These products are intended primarily to provide power to low voltage, electrically operated devices

Notes:

a)    Portable and semipermanent mounted direct plug-in units provided with 15 A blade configurations for use on nominal 120 or 240 V alternating current branch circuits with a maximum potential of 150 V to ground;

b)    Cord- and plug-connected units provided with a 15 or 20 A attachment plug configuration for use on nominal 120 or 240 V alternating current branch circuits with a maximum potential of 150 V to ground; and

c)    Units permanently connected to the input supply for use on nominal 600 V or less alternating or direct current branch circuit.

Direct plug-in and cord-connected units may also be provided with an integral cigarette lighter connector assembly, or a direct current input jack for being powered from a vehicle battery adapter or from a data port associated with information technology equipment. These units utilize an isolating transformer and may incorporate components to provide an alternating- or direct-current output. Each output provides Class 2 power levels in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Maximum output voltage does not exceed 42.4 V peak for alternating current, 60 V for continuous direct current. These products are intended primarily to provide power to low voltage, electrically operated devices.

1.2 These requirements cover direct plug-in and cord-connected products whose input power does not exceed 660 W under any possible condition of output loading.

1.3 These requirements do not cover the effect that a power unit may have on the equipment or system to which it is connected.

1.4 A product marked for a specific end-use involving additional considerations may be subject to additional requirements found in the applicable end-product standard. See 51.4. Examples include considerations related to:

a)    Mechanical risks such as those presented by tools;

b)    Build up of static charges such as those of radio equipment with external antennae connections;

c)    Special shock limits such as those for medical equipment; and

d)    Fire risks such as those posed by decorative lighting products.

1.5 These requirements do not cover products intended to charge batteries for starter motors used to start engines. Products of this type are covered by the Standard for Battery Chargers for Charging Engine-Starter Batteries, UL 1236.

1.6 These requirements cover Class 2 products, as defined in this standard, intended for use with toys. Products of this type shall also comply with the Standard for Toy Transformers, UL 697.

1.7 These requirements do not cover products with outputs other than Class 2, nor battery chargers intended to charge batteries employed in wheel chairs or similar types of mobility aids. Products of this type are covered by the Standard for Power Units Other Than Class 2, UL 1012.

1.8 Products without a rectifier may be covered by the Standard for Low Voltage Transformers – Part 1: General Requirements, UL 5085-1, and the Standard for Low Voltage Transformers – Part 3: Class 2 and Class 3 Transformers, UL 5085-3.

1.9 These requirements do not cover products powered solely by a dc source. Products of this type are covered by the Standard for Power Converters/Inverters and Power Converter/Inverter Systems for Land Vehicles and Marine Craft, UL 458, or by other requirements appropriate for the intended application.

1.10 These requirements do not cover products intended for supplying low voltage landscape lighting. Products of this type are covered by the Standard for Low Voltage Landscape Lighting Systems, UL 1838.

Start Year / Status
Application: Combustible Fuel Equipment
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
Application: Control Gear
UL 60947-1 - Start year: : 2013
Description:

Low-Voltage Switchgear and Controlgear - Part 1: General rules

This standard applies, when required by the relevant product standard, to switchgear and controlgear hereinafter referred to as "equipment" and intended to be connected to circuits, the rated voltage of which does not exceed 1 000 V a.c. or 1 500 V d.c.

Notes:

It does not apply to low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies which are dealt with in IEC 60439.

In certain clauses or subclauses of this standard, the equipment covered by this standard is also referred to as "device", to be consistent with the text of such clauses or subclauses.

The object of this standard is to state those general rules and requirements which are common to low-voltage equipment as defined in 1.1, including for example:

Start Year / Status
Application: Crane and Hoist Control
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
Application: Elevator Control
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
Application: Energy Control and Efficiency
UL 9540 - Start year: : 2016
Description:

Standard for Energy Storage Systems and Equipment

Notes:

1.1 These requirements cover energy storage systems that are intended to receive electric energy and then to store the energy in some form so that the energy storage system can provide electrical energy to loads or to the local/area electric power system (EPS) up to the utility grid when needed. The types of energy storage covered under this standard include electrochemical, chemical, mechanical and thermal. The energy storage systems equipment (constructed either as one unitary complete system or as matched assemblies that when connected are the system) may include equipment for charging, discharging, control, protection, power conversion, communication, controlling the system environment, air, fire detection and suppression system, fuel or other fluid movement and containment, etc. The system may contain other ancillary equipment related to the functioning of the energy storage system.

1.2 The systems covered by this standard include those intended to be used in a standalone mode (e.g. islanded) including "self-supply" systems to provide electric energy and those used in parallel with an electric power system or electric utility grid such as "grid-supply" systems, or applications that perform multiple operational modes.

1.3 Requirements for installation, with the exception of installation manuals and documents for installation provided with the system that are integral to the tested system are outside the scope of this standard. The installation instructions indicate that the energy storage systems are to be installed in accordance with the national and local electrical codes and other applicable codes. This standard assumes that the final installation of the energy storage system will be performed by qualified service personnel in accordance with the applicable installation instructions, installation practices and national installation codes. Energy storage systems are intended for installation subject to approval by the Authority Having Jurisdiction.

Start Year / Status
Application: Equipment, Electronic
UL 840 - Start year: : 2005
Description:

1.1 These requirements cover an alternate approach to specifying through air and over surface spacings for electrical equipment through the use of the principles of insulation coordination.

1.2 The complete principles of insulation coordination involve the consideration of the combination of clearances, creepage distances, and the properties of solid insulation used to constitute the insulation system. The empirical data gathered thus far has been used to develop the requirements for clearances and creepage distances as presented in this standard. The data needed to develop the evaluation procedure for solid insulation is still being gathered. When available, this evaluation procedure will be added to this standard and is not expected to affect the requirements for clearances and creepage distances.

1.3 These requirements may be used as an alternate to required spacing levels specified in end-product standards. The end product standard spacing requirements may be based on use and systems where overvoltages are not controlled, or if controlled, the level of control is unknown.

1.4 These alternate requirements are intended to be applied to a particular product category if the standard covering the product category specifically references UL 840 or any of the requirements therein.

1.5 Users of these requirements may need to specify the overvoltage levels and the methods of control which will be utilized, and establish the pollution degree to which the product insulation system will be expected to be subjected.

1.6 It is not intended that the test values in this standard be employed for production line testing. However, users of these requirements will need to establish a means to ensure that production controls applied to permit the spacing reduction remain in effect during the manufacture of the product. This could include sample testing or physical measurements or another equivalent means.

1.7 Users of these requirements will additionally need to ensure that influencing factors not addressed in this standard, such as mechanical movement, field placement of conductive material, and product damage, will not affect the system for insulation coordination. Examples are the deformation of the enclosure, movement of the fittings for conduit or armored cable, or the improper installation of field wiring. Clearances and creepage distances at those locations must be verified for compliance by physical measurement in accordance with Section 10, Measurement of Clearance and Creepage Distances.

Notes:
Start Year / Status
Application: Industrial
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
UL 508 - Start year: : 1999
Description:

1.1 These requirements cover industrial control devices, and devices accessory thereto, for starting, stopping, regulating, controlling, or protecting electric motors. These requirements also cover industrial control devices or systems that store or process information and are provided with an output motor control function(s). This equipment is for use in ordinary locations in accordance with the National Electrical Code , NFPA 70 .

1.2 These requirements cover devices rated 1500 volts or less. Industrial control equipment covered by these requirements is intended for use in an ambient temperature of 0 - 40°C (32 - 104°F) unless specifically indicated for use in other conditions.

1.3 Deleted December 2, 2003

1.4 Examples of industrial control devices described in 1.1 are:

a)    Manual, magnetic, and solid-state starters and controllers.

b)    Thermal, magnetic, and solid-state overload relays.

c)    Pushbutton stations, including selector switches and pilot lights.

d)    Control circuit switches and relays.

e)    Float, flow, pressure, and vacuum-operated switches.

f)    Resistors and rheostats.

g)    Proximity switches.

h)    Time-delay relays and switches.

i)    Resistors and rheostats intended for industrial heating and lighting, including those for motor generator fields.

j)    Control devices intended for industrial heating and lighting.

k)    Solid-state time-delay relays.

l)    Programmable controllers.

m)    Numerical control systems.

n)    Lighting dimmer systems and controls.

o)    Mercury-tube switches.

p)    Definite purpose controllers.

q)    Solid-state logic controllers.

r)    Industrial microprocessor/computer systems.

s)    Variable voltage autotransformer.

t)    Motor starting autotransformer.

1.5 Industrial control panels are covered by the requirements in the Standard for Industrial Control Panels, UL 508A.

1.6 Fire pump controllers are covered by the requirements in the Standard for Fire Pump Controllers, UL 218.

1.7 An adjustable-speed drive and accessories or modules for use with an adjustable-speed drive are covered by the Standard for Power Conversion Equipment, UL 508C .

1.8 Equipment intended for use in hazardous locations as defined by the National Electrical Code , NFPA 70 , are covered by the Standard for Explosion-Proof and Dust-Ignition-Proof Electrical Equipment for Use in Hazardous (Classified) Locations, UL 1203 .

1.9 Devices that regulate temperature and/or control refrigeration equipment are covered by the Standard for Temperature-Indicating and -Regulating Equipment, UL 873 , and other applicable standards. Compliance with the Standard for Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and Similar Use, Part 1: General Requirements, UL 60730-1, and/or the applicable Part 2 standard from the UL 60730 series fulfills these requirements.

1.10 Electrical instruments are covered by the Standard for Electrical Analog Instruments - Panel Board Types, UL 1437 .

1.11 A product that contains features, characteristics, components, materials, or systems new or different from those covered by the requirements in this standard, and that involves a risk of fire or of electric shock or injury to persons shall be evaluated using appropriate additional component and end-product requirements to maintain the level of safety as originally anticipated by the intent of this standard. A product whose features, characteristics, components, materials, or systems conflict with specific requirements or provisions of this standard does not comply with this standard. Revision of requirements shall be proposed and adopted in conformance with the methods employed for development, revision, and implementation of this standard.

1.12 Products consisting of interlocked controllers and similar assemblies, intended to transfer power to a common load or output between multiple inputs or sources, are covered by the Standard for Transfer Switch Equipment, UL 1008.

Notes:
Start Year / Status
UL 508:2018 - Start year: : 2018
Description:

UL 508 March 2018 replaced UL 508 Jan 1999

UL 508, the Standard for Safety For Industrial Control Equipment,covers industrial control and related devices rated 1500 volts or less used for starting, stopping, regulating, controlling, or protecting electric motors. This equipment is for use in accordance with the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70 in an ambient

temperature of 0 - 40°C (32 - 104°F), and includes devices or systems that store or process information and are provided with an output motor control function

Notes:

1.1 These requirements cover industrial control devices, and devices accessory thereto, for starting, stopping, regulating, controlling, or protecting electric motors. These requirements also cover industrial control devices or systems that store or process information and are provided with an output motor control function(s). This equipment is for use in ordinary locations in accordance with the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70. These requirements do not include requirements for the evaluation of equipment intended for use in functional safety applications.

1.2 These requirements cover devices rated 1500 volts or less. Industrial control equipment covered by these requirements is intended for use in an ambient temperature of 0 – 40°C (32 – 104°F) unless specifically indicated for use in other conditions.

1.3 Examples of industrial control devices described in 1.1 are:

a)    Manual, magnetic, and solid-state starters and controllers.

b)    Thermal, magnetic, and solid-state overload relays.

c)    Pushbutton stations, including selector switches and pilot lights.

d)    Control circuit switches and relays.

e)    Float, flow, pressure, and vacuum-operated switches.

f)    Resistors and rheostats.

g)    Proximity switches.

h)    Time-delay relays and switches.

i)    Resistors and rheostats intended for industrial heating and lighting, including those for motor generator fields.

j)    Control devices intended for industrial heating and lighting.

k)    Solid-state time-delay relays.

l)    Programmable controllers.

m)    Numerical control systems.

n)    Lighting dimmer systems and controls.

o)    Mercury-tube switches.

p)    Definite purpose controllers.

q)    Solid-state logic controllers.

r)    Industrial microprocessor/computer systems.

s)    Variable voltage autotransformer.

t)    Motor starting autotransformer.

1.4 Industrial control panels are covered by the requirements in the Standard for Industrial Control Panels, UL 508A.

1.5 Fire pump controllers are covered by the requirements in the Standard for Fire Pump Controllers, UL 218.

1.6 An adjustable-speed drive and accessories or modules for use with an adjustable-speed drive are covered by the Standard for Power Conversion Equipment, UL 508C.

1.7 Equipment intended for use in hazardous locations as defined by the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, are covered by the Standard for Explosion-Proof and Dust-Ignition-Proof Electrical Equipment for Use in Hazardous (Classified) Locations, UL 1203.

1.8 Devices that regulate temperature and/or control refrigeration equipment are covered by the Standard for Temperature-Indicating and -Regulating Equipment, UL 873, and other applicable standards. Compliance with the Standard for Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and Similar Use, Part 1: General Requirements, UL 60730-1, and/or the applicable Part 2 standard from the UL 60730 series fulfills these requirements.

1.9 Electrical instruments are covered by the Standard for Electrical Analog Instruments– Panel Board Types, UL 1437.

1.10 Products consisting of interlocked controllers and similar assemblies, intended to transfer power to a common load or output between multiple inputs or sources, are covered by the Standard for Transfer Switch Equipment, UL 1008.

Start Year / Status
Application: Laboratory equipment
UL 61010-1 - Start year: : 2012
Description:

This part of IEC 61010 specifies general safety requirements for the following types of electrical equipment and their accessories, wherever they are intended to be used.

This is equipment which by electromagnetic means tests, measures, indicates or records one or more electrical or physical quantities, also non-measuring equipment such as signal generators, measurement standards, power supplies for laboratory use, transducers, transmitters, etc. NOTE 1 This includes bench-top power supplies intended to aid a testing or measuring operation on another piece of equipment. Power supplies intended to power equipment are within the scope of IEC 61558 (see 1.1.2 h)).

This standard also applies to test equipment integrated into manufacturing processes and intended for testing manufactured devices. NOTE 2 Manufacturing test equipment is likely to be installed adjacent to and interconnected with industrial machinery in this application.

Notes:

This is equipment which controls one or more output quantities to specific values, with each value determined by manual setting, by local or remote programming, or by one or more input variables.

This is equipment which measures, indicates, monitors, inspects or analyses materials, or is used to prepare materials, and includes in vitro diagnostic (IVD) equipment.

This equipment may also be used in areas other than laboratories; examples include self-test IVD equipment to be used in the home and inspection equipment to be used to check people or material during transportation.

Start Year / Status
Application: Magnetic Couplers
UL 1577 - Start year: : 2014
Description:

Standard for Optical Isolators

Notes:

1.1 These requirements cover optical isolators, also called optical couplers or photocouplers:

a)    Intended to provide unidirectional signal transfer between dielectrically isolated circuits and,

b)    Intended for use in equipment with a supply voltage not exceeding 600 V ac rms or dc.

1.2 These requirements cover the electrical isolation properties of the insulation between the isolated circuits of the optical isolator.

1.3 These requirements also cover double protection optical isolators that are employed in circuits rated up to 250 V, 50 or 60 Hz, in radio, video, and television equipment, and similar equipment in applications in which breakdown of the optical isolator may result in a risk of fire, electric shock, or injury to persons.

1.4 These requirements do not cover the electrical properties of the separate circuits of the optical isolator.

1.5 These requirements apply to optical isolators for use as components in devices and appliances. Compliance of an optical isolator with these requirements does not indicate that the isolator is acceptable for use as a component of an end product without further investigation.

1.6 Deleted January 23, 2015

Start Year / Status
Application: Marine Use Electrical Equipment
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
Application: Measuring Instruments
UL 61010-2-032 - Start year: : 2020
Description:

Standard for Safety Requirements for Electrical Equipment for Measurement, Control and Laboratory Use - Part 2-032: Particular Requirements for Hand-Held and Hand-Manipulated Current Sensors for Electrical Test and Measurement

Notes:

This clause of Part 1 is applicable except as follows:

Replace the existing text with the following: This part of IEC 61010 specifies safety requirements for HAND-HELD and hand-manipulated current sensors described below.

These current sensors are for measuring, detecting or injecting current, or indicating current waveforms on circuits without physically opening the current path of the circuit being measured. They can be stand-alone current sensors or accessories to other equipment or parts of combined equipment (see ). These include measurement circuits which are part of electrical test and measurement equipment, laboratory equipment, or process control equipment. These current sensors and circuits need additional protective means between the current sensor, the circuit and an OPERATOR.

NOTE 1 Combined equipment is equipment that is electrically connected to a current sensor by means of a permanent connection which can be detached only by the use of a TOOL.

NOTE 2 Some current sensors are also known as current clamps, CLAMP MULTIMETERS and current probes.

Current sensors are hand-manipulated before and/or after a test or measurement, but do not necessarily need to be HAND-HELD during the test or measurement. Current sensors used as FIXED EQUIPMENT are not within the scope of this document.

The following types of current sensors are covered:

a) Type A: a current sensor designed to be applied to or removed from

HAZARDOUS LIVE UNINSULATED CONDUCTORS. Type A current sensors have defined HAND-HELD or hand-manipulated parts providing protection against electric shock from the conductor being measured, and also have protection against short-circuits between wires and between busbars during clamping.

b) Type B: a current sensor which has protection against short-circuits between wires or busbars during clamping but without defined HAND-HELD or hand-manipulated parts which provide protection against electric shock during clamping. Additional protective means are necessary to avoid electric shock from HAZARDOUS LIVE conductors which cannot be de-energised during application or removal of the current sensor.

EXAMPLE 1 Flexible current sensors.

c) Type C: a current sensor without protection against short-circuits between wires or busbars during clamping. Type C current sensors are intended to be applied to or removed from

HAZARDOUS LIVE UNINSULATED CONDUCTORS or from non-limited-energy circuit conductors only when they are de-energised.

EXAMPLE 2 Split-core transducers.

d) Type D: a current sensor designed to be applied to or removed from insulated conductors or from limited-energy circuit conductors.

EXAMPLE 3 Current probes for oscilloscopes and earth leakage current detectors.

All current sensors can also be used with insulated conductors. In this case,

HAZARDS are limited to acceptable levels by the insulation of the conductors.

Additional requirements for CLAMP MULTIMETERS are given in Annex EE.

shows graphical representations of typical current sensors for illustration purposes. Current sensors can look different depending on the design.

Key

1  JAW END (S)

2 JAW

3 Measuring circuit

TERMINALS

Start Year / Status
Application: Optical Isolators
UL 1577 - Start year: : 2014
Description:

Standard for Optical Isolators

Notes:

1.1 These requirements cover optical isolators, also called optical couplers or photocouplers:

a)    Intended to provide unidirectional signal transfer between dielectrically isolated circuits and,

b)    Intended for use in equipment with a supply voltage not exceeding 600 V ac rms or dc.

1.2 These requirements cover the electrical isolation properties of the insulation between the isolated circuits of the optical isolator.

1.3 These requirements also cover double protection optical isolators that are employed in circuits rated up to 250 V, 50 or 60 Hz, in radio, video, and television equipment, and similar equipment in applications in which breakdown of the optical isolator may result in a risk of fire, electric shock, or injury to persons.

1.4 These requirements do not cover the electrical properties of the separate circuits of the optical isolator.

1.5 These requirements apply to optical isolators for use as components in devices and appliances. Compliance of an optical isolator with these requirements does not indicate that the isolator is acceptable for use as a component of an end product without further investigation.

1.6 Deleted January 23, 2015

Start Year / Status
Application: PFC
UL 810 - Start year: : 1995
Description:

Standard for Capacitors

Notes:

1.1 The requirements in Part i of this Standard apply to enclosed capacitors with integral protection intended to reduce the risk of rupture and venting of the capacitor enclosure under internal fault conditions. These requirements apply to capacitors with expansion type protection rated 5 kilovolts or less, and capacitors with segmented film type protection rated 2 kilovolts or less that are intended for use with appliances, lighting equipment, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, motors, and the like, that comply with the requirements for such appliances and equipment.

1.1 revised July 26, 2012

1.1.1 The requirements of Part i may also be used to evaluate the construction only of these types of capacitors with ratings greater than the values noted in 1.1 but no greater than 7.2 kilovolts. Capacitors employing polymeric enclosures or capacitors employing a partial metallic enclosure (i.e. remainder of enclosure such as the cap/cover which is not crimped to the case) that are not provided with internal protection and intended to be located in circuits not requiring fault current protection may be evaluated using only the construction requirements of Part i.

1.1.1 revised July 26, 2012

1.2 The requirements in Part ii of this standard apply to general-use power-factor-correction units consisting of one or more capacitors with or without protective fusing or overloads, with or without a switch or other disconnect device all within a protective enclosure; rated 600 volts maximum and intended for power-factor correction of circuits in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

The requirements of Part ii of this standard do not apply to power factor correction units containing automatic or other circuit monitoring/conditioning controls or automatic systems of multiple connected power factor correction units. Power factor correction units with these additional features shall be evaluated to the Standard for Industrial Control Panels, UL 508A as an industrial control panel.

1.2 revised effective May 21, 2012

1.2.1 A component capacitor used in a power factor correction unit as described in Part ii of this Standard has been evaluated for across-the-line applications in accordance with Part i of this Standard and has been evaluated for a minimum fault current rating of 10K AFC.

1.2.1 revised March 3, 2008

1.2.2 The requirements of Supplement sa apply to electrolytic capacitors for motor start or similar applications including dc circuits rated 600 V or less.

1.2.2 added March 3, 2008

1.3 A capacitor that complies with the requirements in Part i of this standard is intended to be mounted within an appliance or within equipment for which an acceptable outer enclosure is provided.

1.4 The requirements in Part i and Part ii do not apply to capacitors covered by the Standard for Across-the-Line, Antenna Coupling, and Line-by-Pass Capacitors for Radio- and Television-Type Appliances, UL 1414 .

1.5 Other types of capacitors may be investigated to establish compliance with these requirements, and with such additional test criteria as may be found necessary.

1.6 A product that contains features, characteristics, components, materials, or systems new or different from those covered by the requirements in this standard, and that involves a risk of fire or of electric shock or injury to persons shall be evaluated using appropriate additional component and end-product requirements to maintain the level of safety as originally anticipated by the intent of this standard. A product whose features, characteristics, components, materials, or systems conflict with specific requirements or provisions of this standard does not comply with this standard. Revision of requirements shall be proposed and adopted in conformance with the methods employed for development, revision, and implementation of this standard.

1.6 revised March 3, 2008

Start Year / Status
Application: Photocouplers/Optocouplers
UL 1577 - Start year: : 2014
Description:

Standard for Optical Isolators

Notes:

1.1 These requirements cover optical isolators, also called optical couplers or photocouplers:

a)    Intended to provide unidirectional signal transfer between dielectrically isolated circuits and,

b)    Intended for use in equipment with a supply voltage not exceeding 600 V ac rms or dc.

1.2 These requirements cover the electrical isolation properties of the insulation between the isolated circuits of the optical isolator.

1.3 These requirements also cover double protection optical isolators that are employed in circuits rated up to 250 V, 50 or 60 Hz, in radio, video, and television equipment, and similar equipment in applications in which breakdown of the optical isolator may result in a risk of fire, electric shock, or injury to persons.

1.4 These requirements do not cover the electrical properties of the separate circuits of the optical isolator.

1.5 These requirements apply to optical isolators for use as components in devices and appliances. Compliance of an optical isolator with these requirements does not indicate that the isolator is acceptable for use as a component of an end product without further investigation.

1.6 Deleted January 23, 2015

Start Year / Status
Application: Power Supplies
UL 1310 - Start year: : 2014
Description:

These requirements cover indoor and outdoor use Class 2 power supplies and battery chargers. These units utilize an isolating transformer and may incorporate components to provide an alternating- or direct-current output. Each output provides Class 2 power levels in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Maximum output voltage does not exceed 42.4 V peak for alternating current, 60 V for continuous direct current. These products are intended primarily to provide power to low voltage, electrically operated devices

Notes:

a)    Portable and semipermanent mounted direct plug-in units provided with 15 A blade configurations for use on nominal 120 or 240 V alternating current branch circuits with a maximum potential of 150 V to ground;

b)    Cord- and plug-connected units provided with a 15 or 20 A attachment plug configuration for use on nominal 120 or 240 V alternating current branch circuits with a maximum potential of 150 V to ground; and

c)    Units permanently connected to the input supply for use on nominal 600 V or less alternating or direct current branch circuit.

Direct plug-in and cord-connected units may also be provided with an integral cigarette lighter connector assembly, or a direct current input jack for being powered from a vehicle battery adapter or from a data port associated with information technology equipment. These units utilize an isolating transformer and may incorporate components to provide an alternating- or direct-current output. Each output provides Class 2 power levels in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Maximum output voltage does not exceed 42.4 V peak for alternating current, 60 V for continuous direct current. These products are intended primarily to provide power to low voltage, electrically operated devices.

1.2 These requirements cover direct plug-in and cord-connected products whose input power does not exceed 660 W under any possible condition of output loading.

1.3 These requirements do not cover the effect that a power unit may have on the equipment or system to which it is connected.

1.4 A product marked for a specific end-use involving additional considerations may be subject to additional requirements found in the applicable end-product standard. See 51.4. Examples include considerations related to:

a)    Mechanical risks such as those presented by tools;

b)    Build up of static charges such as those of radio equipment with external antennae connections;

c)    Special shock limits such as those for medical equipment; and

d)    Fire risks such as those posed by decorative lighting products.

1.5 These requirements do not cover products intended to charge batteries for starter motors used to start engines. Products of this type are covered by the Standard for Battery Chargers for Charging Engine-Starter Batteries, UL 1236.

1.6 These requirements cover Class 2 products, as defined in this standard, intended for use with toys. Products of this type shall also comply with the Standard for Toy Transformers, UL 697.

1.7 These requirements do not cover products with outputs other than Class 2, nor battery chargers intended to charge batteries employed in wheel chairs or similar types of mobility aids. Products of this type are covered by the Standard for Power Units Other Than Class 2, UL 1012.

1.8 Products without a rectifier may be covered by the Standard for Low Voltage Transformers – Part 1: General Requirements, UL 5085-1, and the Standard for Low Voltage Transformers – Part 3: Class 2 and Class 3 Transformers, UL 5085-3.

1.9 These requirements do not cover products powered solely by a dc source. Products of this type are covered by the Standard for Power Converters/Inverters and Power Converter/Inverter Systems for Land Vehicles and Marine Craft, UL 458, or by other requirements appropriate for the intended application.

1.10 These requirements do not cover products intended for supplying low voltage landscape lighting. Products of this type are covered by the Standard for Low Voltage Landscape Lighting Systems, UL 1838.

Start Year / Status
UL 61010-1 - Start year: : 2012
Description:

This part of IEC 61010 specifies general safety requirements for the following types of electrical equipment and their accessories, wherever they are intended to be used.

This is equipment which by electromagnetic means tests, measures, indicates or records one or more electrical or physical quantities, also non-measuring equipment such as signal generators, measurement standards, power supplies for laboratory use, transducers, transmitters, etc. NOTE 1 This includes bench-top power supplies intended to aid a testing or measuring operation on another piece of equipment. Power supplies intended to power equipment are within the scope of IEC 61558 (see 1.1.2 h)).

This standard also applies to test equipment integrated into manufacturing processes and intended for testing manufactured devices. NOTE 2 Manufacturing test equipment is likely to be installed adjacent to and interconnected with industrial machinery in this application.

Notes:

This is equipment which controls one or more output quantities to specific values, with each value determined by manual setting, by local or remote programming, or by one or more input variables.

This is equipment which measures, indicates, monitors, inspects or analyses materials, or is used to prepare materials, and includes in vitro diagnostic (IVD) equipment.

This equipment may also be used in areas other than laboratories; examples include self-test IVD equipment to be used in the home and inspection equipment to be used to check people or material during transportation.

Start Year / Status
UL 508C - Start year: : 2016
Description:

1.1 These requirements cover open or enclosed equipment that supplies power to control a motor or motors operating at a frequency or voltage different than that of the input supply. These requirements also cover power-supply modules, input/output modules, Silicon Controlled Rectifier (SCR) or Transistor output modules, dynamic braking units, and input/output accessory kits for use with power conversion equipment.

1.2 This equipment is for use in ordinary locations in accordance with Articles 430 and 440 of the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70.

1.3 These requirements cover devices rated 1500 volts or less.

1.4 Equipment intended for use in hazardous locations as defined by the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, shall be evaluated to the Standard for Industrial Control Equipment for Use in Hazardous (Classified) Locations, UL 698.

1.5 Deleted November 5, 2004

Notes:
Start Year / Status
UL 1012 - Start year: : 2010
Description:

These requirements cover portable, stationary, and fixed power units having an input rating of 600 volts or less, direct- and alternating- current, with at least one output not marked Class 2, and that are intended to be employed in ordinary locations in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.

1.2 These requirements cover general purpose power supplies and power supplies for uses such as to supply some household appliances, school laboratories, cathodic protection equipment; power supply-battery charger combinations; and industrial equipment, including inverters, divided into two classes - those rated 10 kilovolt-amperes or less and those rated more than 10 kilovolt-amperes.

1.3 Power units with all outputs identified as Class 2 are covered under the Standard for Class 2 Power Units, UL 1310.

1.4 These requirements do not cover the following types of battery chargers:

a)    Battery chargers intended to charge motor-starting batteries as covered by Standard for Battery Chargers for Charging Engine-Starter Batteries, UL 1236;

b)    Battery chargers for charging industrial batteries which power material handling trucks, tractors, personnel carriers, and similar motive equipment, as covered by the Standard for Industrial Battery Chargers, UL 1564;

c)    Chargers or charging functions incorporated into converter or inverters for use in recreational vehicles and boats, as covered by the Standard for Power Converters/Inverters and Power Converter/Inverter Systems for Land Vehicles and Marine Crafts, UL 458; and

d)    Charge controllers or charging functions incorporated into equipment for use in independent power systems, as covered by the Standard for Inverters, Converters, Controllers and Interconnection System Equipment for Use With Distributed Energy Resources, UL 1741.

1.5 A battery charger not wholly within the scope of one of the standards specified in 1.4 shall be investigated to the requirements of this Standard supplemented by the applicable requirements of whichever of the standards in 1.4 is most applicable.

1.6 These requirements do not cover a power supply for a fire-protective or burglary-protective signaling system, electrostatic-air cleaning equipment, recreational vehicles, electric discharge or neon tubing, test equipment for commercial or industrial laboratories; or an appliance or system in which the power supply is used.

1.7 These requirements cover power supplies for centralized ac or dc power systems, including dc power supplies, rectifiers, and the like, that form part of these systems.

1.8 A power supply that is intended for use with a specific type of product other than as referenced in 1.2 is investigated under the standard for that end product.

1.9 These requirements do not cover the effect that a power supply may have on an equipment or a system to which it is connected.

1.10 A power system, the primary function of which is maintaining continuity of an alternating power source in case of input power failure, is covered under the Standard for Uninterruptible Power Systems, UL 1778.

Notes:
Start Year / Status
Application: Refrigeration Equipment
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
Application: Service Equipment
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
Application: Solar/Photovoltaic Equipment
UL 62109-1 - Start year: : 2014
Description:

This part of IEC 62109 applies to the power conversion equipment (PCE) for use in Photovoltaic (PV) systems where a uniform technical level with respect to safety is necessary. This standard defines the minimum requirements for the design and manufacture of PCE for protection against electric shock, energy, fire, mechanical and other hazards.

This standard provides general requirements applicable to all types of PV PCE. There are additional parts of this standard that provide specific requirements for the different types of power converters, such as Part 2 - inverters. Additional parts may be published as new products and technologies are commercialised.

Replace the maximum PV source circuit voltage of 1 500 V d.c. with 2 000 V d.c.

Notes:

Replace the maximum PV source circuit voltage of 1 500 V d.c. with 2 000 V d.c.

This standard covers PCE connected to systems not exceeding maximum PV source circuit voltage of 1 500 V d.c. The equipment may also be connected to systems not exceeding 1 000 V a.c. at the a.c. mains circuits, non-mains a.c. load circuits, and to other DC source or load circuits such as batteries. This standard may be used for accessories for use with PCE, except where more appropriate standards exist.

Evaluation of PCE to this standard includes evaluation of all features and functions incorporated in or available for the PCE, or referred to in the documentation provided with the PCE, if such features or functions can affect compliance with the requirements of this standard.

Start Year / Status
UL 1699B - Start year: : 2011
Description:

Photovoltaic (PV) DC Arc-Fault Circuit Protection

Notes:

1.1 These requirements cover DC photovoltaic arc-fault circuit protection devices intended for use in solar photovoltaic electrical energy systems as described in Article 690 of the National Electrical Code , NFPA 70. This protection is intended to mitigate the effects of arcing faults that may pose a risk of fire ignition under certain conditions if the arcing persists.

1.2 These requirements cover devices including photovoltaic (PV) dc arc-fault circuit-interrupters (AFCI), arc-fault detectors (AFD), interrupting devices (ID) and inverters, converters, and charge controllers with integral arc-fault circuit-interrupter protection.

1.3 These requirements cover devices rated 1000 volts or less. They are intended for use in dc electrical systems that are supplied by a photovoltaic source, such as a module with solar cells designed to generate dc power when exposed to sunlight.

1.4 These requirements are intended to be used with the Standard for Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupters, UL 1699, as these requirements modify the requirements described in that standard.

1.5 These devices are not intended to detect glowing connections.

1.6 In these requirements the term “device” is used generically to apply to all of the devices covered by these requirements and is modified when the requirement does not apply to all types.

1.7 A PV AFCI, AFD or ID device that is also intended to perform other device functions, such as overcurrent protection, disconnects, combiner boxes, or other similar functions, or any combination thereof, shall comply additionally with the requirements of the applicable Standard or Standards that cover devices that provide those functions as intended for use in PV systems.

Start Year / Status
Application: Sub-Assemblies
UL 840 - Start year: : 2005
Description:

1.1 These requirements cover an alternate approach to specifying through air and over surface spacings for electrical equipment through the use of the principles of insulation coordination.

1.2 The complete principles of insulation coordination involve the consideration of the combination of clearances, creepage distances, and the properties of solid insulation used to constitute the insulation system. The empirical data gathered thus far has been used to develop the requirements for clearances and creepage distances as presented in this standard. The data needed to develop the evaluation procedure for solid insulation is still being gathered. When available, this evaluation procedure will be added to this standard and is not expected to affect the requirements for clearances and creepage distances.

1.3 These requirements may be used as an alternate to required spacing levels specified in end-product standards. The end product standard spacing requirements may be based on use and systems where overvoltages are not controlled, or if controlled, the level of control is unknown.

1.4 These alternate requirements are intended to be applied to a particular product category if the standard covering the product category specifically references UL 840 or any of the requirements therein.

1.5 Users of these requirements may need to specify the overvoltage levels and the methods of control which will be utilized, and establish the pollution degree to which the product insulation system will be expected to be subjected.

1.6 It is not intended that the test values in this standard be employed for production line testing. However, users of these requirements will need to establish a means to ensure that production controls applied to permit the spacing reduction remain in effect during the manufacture of the product. This could include sample testing or physical measurements or another equivalent means.

1.7 Users of these requirements will additionally need to ensure that influencing factors not addressed in this standard, such as mechanical movement, field placement of conductive material, and product damage, will not affect the system for insulation coordination. Examples are the deformation of the enclosure, movement of the fittings for conduit or armored cable, or the improper installation of field wiring. Clearances and creepage distances at those locations must be verified for compliance by physical measurement in accordance with Section 10, Measurement of Clearance and Creepage Distances.

Notes:
Start Year / Status
Application: Surge Protectors
UL 1449 - Start year: : 2014
Description:

These requirements cover enclosed and open-type Surge Protective Devices (SPDs) designed for repeated limiting of transient voltage surges as specified in the standard on 50 or 60 Hz power circuits not exceeding 1000 V and for PV applications up to 1500 V dc and designated as follows:

Type 1 - Permanently connected SPDs intended for installation between the secondary of the service transformer and the line side of the service equipment overcurrent device, as well as the load side, including watt-hour meter socket enclosures and Molded Case SPDs intended to be installed without an external overcurrent protective device. Type 1 SPDs for use in PV systems can be connected between the PV array and the main service disconnect.

Type 2 - Permanently connected SPDs intended for installation on the load side of the service equipment overcurrent device; including SPDs located at the branch panel and Molded Case SPDs.

Type 3 - Point of utilization SPDs, installed at a minimum conductor length of 10 meters (30 feet) from the electrical service panel to the point of utilization, for example cord connected, direct plug-in, receptacle type and SPDs installed at the utilization equipment being protected. See marking in 80.3. The distance (10 meters) is exclusive of conductors provided with or used to attach SPDs.

Type 4 Component Assemblies - Component assembly consisting of one or more Type 5 components together with a disconnect (integral or external) or a means of complying with the limited current tests in 44.4.

Type 1, 2, 3 Component Assemblies - Consists of a Type 4 component assembly with internal or external short circuit protection.

Type 5 - Discrete component surge suppressors, such as MOVs that may be mounted on a PWB, connected by its leads or provided within an enclosure with mounting means and wiring terminations.

1.2 Except as indicated in 1.3, the products covered by this Standard are rated and intended for connection to circuits or supply sources having nominal voltage ratings as specified in Table 44.1.

1.3 A product intended for connection to an ac circuit or supply source other than that specified in 1.2 may be examined and tested in accordance with the intent of the requirements in this standard and, if found to be substantially equivalent, may be judged to comply with this Standard.

1.4 These requirements cover cord-connected direct plug-in, and permanently connected SPDs intended for indoor and outdoor use in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA-70.

1.5 These requirements do not cover the interconnection of multiple field installed SPDs.

1.6 These requirements cover SPDs that may include components specifically intended to function as filters for conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI) or noise, in addition to limiting transient voltage surges. See Section 26.

1.7 These requirements cover SPDs employing circuit components intended to provide secondary protection for telephone communication circuits and circuit components intended to protect data communication or fire alarm circuits. See Section 27.

1.8 These requirements cover SPDs employing antenna connections for audio-video products. See Section 28.

1.9 An SPD that has a battery backup feature or other uninterruptible power supply equipment shall also comply with the applicable requirements in the Standard for Uninterruptible Power Supply Equipment, UL 1778. See Section 30.

1.10 These requirements cover SPDs/Panelboard Extension Modules. These products shall also comply with the Standard for Panelboards, UL 67. See Section 31.

1.11 These requirements do not evaluate the effect of SPDs on connected loads, the effect of SPDs on harmonic distortion of the supply voltage, the degree of attenuation provided by SPDs, nor the adequacy of the voltage protection rating of SPDs to protect specific connected equipment from upset or damage.

1.12 This standard does not cover cord connected or direct plug-in SPDs intended for use with medical equipment. Medical equipment is typically intended for use in General Patient Care Areas or Critical Patient Care Areas as defined by Article 517 of the National Electrical Code for Health Care Facilities. SPDs intended for such use shall comply with the requirements of the Standard for Safety of Medical Electrical Equipment, Part 1: General Requirements, UL 60601-1, and the Standard for Safety Requirements for Medical Electrical Systems, IEC 60601-1-1.

1.13 An SPD intended to serve as an outlet cover plate or outlet box hood shall comply with the requirement for faceplates in the Standard for Cover Plates for Flush Mounted Wiring Devices,UL 514D.

1.14 An SPD intended for use in a Lightning Protection System (LPS) shall comply with the Surge Protection requirements in the Standard for Installation Requirements for Lightning Protections Systems, UL 96A.

1.15 A Type 3 SPD may employ additional low voltage supplementary circuitry to power a USB charger.

1.16 A cord-connected or direct plug-in Type 3 SPD may employ a replaceable or non-replaceable rechargeable battery to power a USB output circuit.

1.17 A direct plug-in SPD employing more than two receptacles shall also comply with the applicable requirements in the Standard for Current Taps, ANSI/UL 498A.

1.18 A cord-connected SPD employing more than two receptacles shall also comply with the applicable requirements in the requirements in the Standard for Relocatable Power Taps, UL 1363 or the Standard for Furniture Power Distribution Units, UL 962A.

Notes:
Start Year / Status
Application: Switchgear
UL 60947-1 - Start year: : 2013
Description:

Low-Voltage Switchgear and Controlgear - Part 1: General rules

This standard applies, when required by the relevant product standard, to switchgear and controlgear hereinafter referred to as "equipment" and intended to be connected to circuits, the rated voltage of which does not exceed 1 000 V a.c. or 1 500 V d.c.

Notes:

It does not apply to low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies which are dealt with in IEC 60439.

In certain clauses or subclauses of this standard, the equipment covered by this standard is also referred to as "device", to be consistent with the text of such clauses or subclauses.

The object of this standard is to state those general rules and requirements which are common to low-voltage equipment as defined in 1.1, including for example:

Start Year / Status
Application: Test and measurement equipment
UL 61010-1 - Start year: : 2012
Description:

This part of IEC 61010 specifies general safety requirements for the following types of electrical equipment and their accessories, wherever they are intended to be used.

This is equipment which by electromagnetic means tests, measures, indicates or records one or more electrical or physical quantities, also non-measuring equipment such as signal generators, measurement standards, power supplies for laboratory use, transducers, transmitters, etc. NOTE 1 This includes bench-top power supplies intended to aid a testing or measuring operation on another piece of equipment. Power supplies intended to power equipment are within the scope of IEC 61558 (see 1.1.2 h)).

This standard also applies to test equipment integrated into manufacturing processes and intended for testing manufactured devices. NOTE 2 Manufacturing test equipment is likely to be installed adjacent to and interconnected with industrial machinery in this application.

Notes:

This is equipment which controls one or more output quantities to specific values, with each value determined by manual setting, by local or remote programming, or by one or more input variables.

This is equipment which measures, indicates, monitors, inspects or analyses materials, or is used to prepare materials, and includes in vitro diagnostic (IVD) equipment.

This equipment may also be used in areas other than laboratories; examples include self-test IVD equipment to be used in the home and inspection equipment to be used to check people or material during transportation.

Start Year / Status
Application: Voltage < or = 1000 Vac
UL 60947-1 - Start year: : 2013
Description:

Low-Voltage Switchgear and Controlgear - Part 1: General rules

This standard applies, when required by the relevant product standard, to switchgear and controlgear hereinafter referred to as "equipment" and intended to be connected to circuits, the rated voltage of which does not exceed 1 000 V a.c. or 1 500 V d.c.

Notes:

It does not apply to low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies which are dealt with in IEC 60439.

In certain clauses or subclauses of this standard, the equipment covered by this standard is also referred to as "device", to be consistent with the text of such clauses or subclauses.

The object of this standard is to state those general rules and requirements which are common to low-voltage equipment as defined in 1.1, including for example:

Start Year / Status
Application: Voltage < or = 1500 Vdc
UL 60947-1 - Start year: : 2013
Description:

Low-Voltage Switchgear and Controlgear - Part 1: General rules

This standard applies, when required by the relevant product standard, to switchgear and controlgear hereinafter referred to as "equipment" and intended to be connected to circuits, the rated voltage of which does not exceed 1 000 V a.c. or 1 500 V d.c.

Notes:

It does not apply to low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies which are dealt with in IEC 60439.

In certain clauses or subclauses of this standard, the equipment covered by this standard is also referred to as "device", to be consistent with the text of such clauses or subclauses.

The object of this standard is to state those general rules and requirements which are common to low-voltage equipment as defined in 1.1, including for example:

Start Year / Status
Application: Voltage < or = 600 V
UL 508A - Start year: : 2013
Description:

These requirements cover industrial control panels intended for general industrial use, operating from a voltage of 600 volts or less. This equipment is intended for installation in ordinary locations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70, where the ambient temperature does not exceed 40°C (104°F) maximum.

These requirements also cover industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels intended for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment, elevator control, crane or hoist control, service equipment use, marine use, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and for control of industrial machinery including metalworking machine tools, power press controls, and plastic injection molding machinery.

Notes:

This equipment consists of assemblies of two or more power circuit components, such as motor controllers, overload relays, fused disconnect switches, and circuit breakers, or control circuit components, such as pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, timers, and control relays, or a combination of power and control circuit components, with associated wiring, and terminals . These components are mounted on, or contained within, an enclosure, or are mounted on a sub-panel.

An industrial control panel does not include an evaluation of the controlled equipment such as motors, heaters, lighting, and other loads connected to power circuits. Unless specifically noted on the wiring diagram of the industrial control panel, an industrial control panel does not include equipment mounted remotely from the panel and connected via a wiring systems or equipment field installed on or within the industrial control panel.

Start Year / Status
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